Mr Bligh's Bad Language: Passion, Power and Theatre on the Bounty

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 25, 1994 - History - 460 pages
2 Reviews
Captain Bligh and the mutiny on the Bounty have become proverbial in their capacity to evoke the extravagant and violent abuse of power. But William Bligh was one of the least violent disciplinarians in the British navy. It is this paradox that inspired Greg Dening to ask why the mutiny took place. His book explores the theatrical nature of what was enacted in the power-play on deck, on the beaches of Tahiti and in the murderous settlement at Pitcairn, on the altar stones and temples of sacrifice, and on the catheads from which men were hanged. Part of the key lies in the curious puzzle of Mr Bligh's bad language.
 

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MR. BLIGH'S BAD LANGUAGE: Passion, Power and Theatre on the Bounty

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A learned, humane, provocative ``creative reading'' of the mutiny on the Bounty—the events; their meaning and representation in native lore, British life, the theater, and cinema; and their ... Read full review

Mr Bligh's bad language: passion, power, and theatre on the Bounty

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Mutiny on the Bounty summons to the popular mind images of violence and power on the high seas. Dening restores a sense of perspective in this fascinating study of the Bounty through images of space ... Read full review

Contents

I
II
III
1
IV
17
V
35
VI
55
VII
88
VIII
96
XXI
217
XXII
222
XXIII
230
XXIV
239
XXV
253
XXVI
257
XXVII
262
XXVIII
283

IX
113
X
124
XI
130
XII
133
XIII
140
XIV
142
XV
147
XVI
153
XVII
157
XVIII
175
XIX
189
XX
213
XXIX
305
XXX
309
XXXI
324
XXXII
329
XXXIII
334
XXXIV
339
XXXV
369
XXXVI
375
XXXVII
397
XXXVIII
429
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