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gion—as a zealous Protestant, defending the doctrines of the Reformation, and as a genuine believer, “ careful to maintain good works;" I consider him as having realized and exemplified his devout wish mentioned in a former part of .

“As FOR ME, MY WISH IS TO LIVE AND TO DIE AN HONEST Man.”

this work,

THE FOLLOWING IS COPIED FROM TOLAND'S

LIFE.

An exact CATALOGUE OF ALL MILTON'S WORKS, IN

THEIR TRUE ORDER.

1. Of Reformation in England, and the Causes that

hitherto have hinder'd it. In two Books: written to a Friend.

2. Of Prelatical Episcopacy, and whether it can be deduc'd

from the Apostolical Times.

3. The Reason of Church Government urg'd against Pre

lacy. In two Books.

4. Animadversions upon the Remonstrants Defence against

Smectymnuus.

5. An Apology for Smectymnuus.

6. The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce restor’d for the

Good of both Sexes.

7. Tetrachordon; or Expositions upon the four chief places

of Scripture which treat of Marriage, or Nullities in Marriage.

8. The Judgment of Martin Bucer concerning Divorce.

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ANIMADVERSIONS

ON

DR. JOHNSON'S LIFE OF MILTON.

This most illiberal writer intimates at the commencement of his Life of Milton, that instead of writing a new life, “ he might perhaps more properly have contented himself with the addition of a few notes to Mr. Fenton's, which had been previously written."

It would have been well for the interests of truth had he sternly adhered to that opinion, as there perhaps never was so flagrant an instance of downright misrepresentation and perversion of facts, for the mean purpose of caricaturing and distorting the features of a public man, than in Johnson's Life of Milton: a foul blot on English biography, a lasting disgrace to the man who could lend himself to such baseness.

It appears to me impossible to account for the venomous attack which he has made upon this most illustrious of our countrymen, but on the supposition that he was influenced by the same malignant feelings and principles of Jacob's sons towards Joseph: “His brethren hated him, and could not speak peaceably to him; moved with envy they sold him into Egypt.” Dr. Johnson hated Milton, because he

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