The Law and Parliament

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Dawn Oliver, Gavin Drewry
Cambridge University Press, 1998 - Law - 219 pages
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The Law and Parliament is a collection of essays by leading constitutional and parliamentary experts on issues that are at the core of current debate about the changing British constitution and the sometimes difficult relationships between government and law. The book deals with matters of intense topical debate including the incorporation of the European Convention on Human Rights and the implications of the Human Rights Act 1998, the establishment of a new Scottish Parliament, ways in which the courts impinge upon the law of Parliament and vice versa and the Nolan Report. It also examines the position of lawyers as members of the two Houses of Parliament and looks at the mechanism through which Parliament obtains legal advice.
 

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This book entails the most important aspect in a legal system covering difficult relationship between law and government , position of lawyers as members of the two houses of parliament and mechanism through the parliament obtains legal advice.

Contents

The law and Parliament
1
The autonomy of Parliament
14
Nolan sleaze and parliamentary selfregulation
27
The Lord Chancellors accountability to Parliament
40
Statute law and case law applicable to Parliament
48
Is there a presumption that statutes do not bind Parliament?
64
Questioning parliamentary proceedings in a court or place out of Parliament
77
Separation of powers and legal advice for Parliament
92
The Register of Interests
111
Conclusion
124
Conclusion
137
Hart and the constitution
151
The parliamentary activity of lawyerpeers
166
Parliamentary human rights scrutiny procedures
181
Legal aspect of relations between the United Kingdom
192
Appendix 1
208

The law relating to members conduct
105

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