The works of Walter Scott, Esq, Volume 3

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Printed by James Ballantyne and Co. for Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, London ; and A. Constable and Co., Edinburgh, 1806
 

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Page 45 - THERE lived a wife at Usher's Well, And a wealthy wife was she ; She had three stout and stalwart sons, And sent them oer the sea. They hadna been a week from her, A week but barely ane, Whan word came to the carline wife That her three sons were gane.
Page 176 - Ye'll ne'er get back to your ain countrie." 0 they rade on, and farther on, And they waded through rivers aboon the knee, And they saw neither sun nor moon, But they heard the roaring of the sea. It was mirk mirk night, and there was nae stern light, And they waded through red blude to the knee ; For a' the blude that's shed on earth Rins through the springs o
Page 174 - Thomas," she said, That name does not belang to me ; I am but the queen of fair Elfland, That am hither come to visit thee. " Harp and carp, Thomas," she said ; " Harp and carp along wi' me ; And if ye dare to kiss my lips, Sure of your bodie I will be.
Page 235 - Yet hear but my word, my noble lord! For I heard her name his name ; And that lady bright, she called the knight Sir Richard of Coldinghame." — The bold Baron's brow then changed, I trow, From high blood-red to pale — " The grave is deep and dark — and the corpse is stiff and stark — So I may not trust thy tale. "Where fair Tweed flows round holy Melrose, And Eildon slopes to the plain, Full three nights ago, by some secret foe, That gay gallant was slain. " The varying light deceived thy...
Page 173 - TRUE Thomas lay on Huntlie bank ; A ferlie he spied wi' his ee ; And there he saw a ladye bright, Come riding down by the Eildon Tree. Her skirt was o' the grass-green silk, Her mantle o' the velvet fyne ; At ilka tett of her horse's mane, Hung fifty siller bells and nine.
Page 234 - Then changed, I trow, was that bold baron's brow From the dark to the blood-red high; "Now, tell me the mien of the knight thou hast seen, For, by Mary, he shall die!" "His arms shone full bright in the beacon's red light; His plume it was scarlet and blue; On his shield was a hound in a silver leash bound, And his crest was a branch of the yew.
Page 46 - The carline wife's three sons came hame, and their hats were o' the birk. It neither grew in syke nor ditch, Nor yet in ony sheugh; But at the gates o Paradise, That birk grew fair enough. 'Blow up the fire, my maidens! Bring water from the well! For a' my house shall feast this night, Since my three sons are well.
Page 128 - Dool and wae for the order, sent our lads to the border! The English, for ance, by guile wan the day: The flowers of the forest, that fought aye the foremost, The prime of our land, are cauld in the clay. We'll hear nae mair lilting, at the ewe milking; Women and bairns are heartless and wae : Sighing and moaning, on ilka green loaning — The flowers of the forest are a
Page 176 - For a' the blude that's shed on earth Rins through the springs o' that countrie. Syne they came on to a garden green, And she pu'd an apple frae a tree — " Take this for thy wages, true Thomas; It will give thee the tongue that can never lie." —
Page 235 - His arms shone full bright in the beacon's red light; His plume it was scarlet and blue; On his shield was a hound in a silver leash bound, And his crest was a branch of the yew." "Thou liest, thou liest, thou little foot-page, Loud dost thou lie to me! For that knight is cold and low laid in the mould, All under the Eildon-tree." "Yet hear but my word, my noble lord! For I heard her name his name; And that lady bright, she called the knight Sir Richard of Coldinghame.

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