The Founders of the Institute, and Its First President: An Address Delivered Before the American Institute of Instruction at Its Annual Meeting in Tremont Temple, Boston, August 1st, 1867

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S. Chism, Franklin Printing House, 1867 - 108 pages

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Page 3 - There shall be sung another golden age, The rise of empire and of arts, The good and great inspiring epic rage, The wisest heads and noblest hearts.
Page 59 - A pillar of state : deep on his front engraven Deliberation sat and public care ; And princely counsel in his face yet shone, Majestic though in ruin : sage he stood, With Atlantean shoulders fit to bear The weight of mightiest monarchies ; his look Drew audience and attention still as night Or summer's noontide air...
Page 71 - Oriel, in which it was predicted that, if Mr. Arnold were elected to the head-mastership of Rugby, he would change the face of education all through the public schools of England.
Page 84 - He had a great talent for collecting facts, and for bringing those he had to bear with ingenious felicity on the topic of the moment. Let him rise to speak on what occasion soever, a fact had always just transpired which composed, with some other fact well known to the audience, the most pregnant and happy coincidence. It was remarked that for a man who threw out so many facts he was seldom convicted of a blunder. He had a good deal of special learning, and all his learning was available for purposes...
Page 81 - ... meet to be inheritors with the saints in light — and all in consequence of the direction which we have given to them in youth ? I ask again, what profession has any higher rewards? Again, we at this day are in a manner the pioneers in this work in this country. Education, as a science, has scarcely yet been naturalized among us. Radical improvement in the means of education is an idea that seems but just to have entered into men's minds. It becomes us to act worthily of our station. Let us...
Page 44 - I am, as it were, charmed and fettered ; my heart leaps like an inspired Corybant ; my inmost soul is stung by his words as by the bite of a serpent ; it is indignant at its own rude and ignoble character. I often weep tears of regret, and think how base and inglorious is the life I lead.
Page 44 - When I heard Pericles, or any other great orator, I was entertained and delighted, and I felt that he had spoken well. But no mortal speech has ever excited in my mind such emotions as are kindled by this magician. Whenever I hear him, I am, as it were, charmed and fettered. My heart leaps like an inspired Corybant. My inmost soul is stung by his words, as by the bite of a serpent; it is indignant at its own rude and ignoble character. I often weep tears of regret, and think how vain and inglorious...
Page 84 - There was an influence on the young people from the genius of Everett which was almost comparable to that of Pericles in Athens. He had an inspiration which did not go beyond his head, but which made him the master of elegance. If any of my readers were at that period in Boston or Cambridge, they will easily remember his radiant beauty of person, of a classic...
Page 84 - ... of his form needed ; sculptured lips ; a voice of such rich tones, such precise and perfect utterance, that, although slightly nasal, it was the most mellow, and beautiful, and correct, of all the instruments of the time. The word that he spoke, in the manner in which he spoke it, became current and classical in New England.
Page 93 - He did not receive a liberal education, but, as a tribute to his personal and professional worth, the honorary degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon him by Brown University (1854), and Harvard College (1855).

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