Gay's Beggar's Opera: Its Content, History & Influence

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 165 - Through all the employments of life, Each neighbour abuses his brother ; Whore and rogue, they call husband and wife : All professions be-rogue one another. The priest calls the lawyer a cheat : ( The lawyer be-knaves the divine : ! And the statesman, because he's so great, Thinks his trade as honest as mine.
Page 3 - We were all, at the first night of it, in great uncertainty of the event ; till we were very much encouraged by overhearing the duke of Argyle, who sat in the next box to us, say ' It will do — it must do ! I see it in the eyes of them.
Page 322 - Twas when the seas were roaring With hollow blasts of wind, A damsel lay deploring All on a rock reclined. Wide o'er the foaming billows She cast a wistful look; Her head was crown'd with willows That trembled o'er the brook. " ' Twelve months are gone and over, And nine long tedious days; Why didst thou, venturous lover — Why didst thou trust the seas ? Cease, cease, thou cruel Ocean, And let my lover rest; Ah!
Page 253 - Of this performance, when it was printed, the reception was different, according to the different opinion of its readers. Swift commended it for the excellence of its morality, as a piece that " placed all kinds of vice in the strongest and most odious light ;" but others, and among them Dr.
Page 253 - Opera the gangs of robbers were evidently multiplied. Both these decisions are surely exaggerated. The play, like many others, was plainly written only to divert, without any moral purpose, and is therefore not likely to do good; nor can it be conceived, without more speculation than life requires or admits, to be productive of much evil.
Page 369 - The Politicians to a man agree, that it is free from particular reflections, but that the Satire on general societies of men is too severe.
Page 4 - Oh, ponder well ! be not severe ! the audience being much affected by the innocent looks of Polly, when she came to those two lines, which exhibit at once a painful and ridiculous image, For on the rope that hangs my dear, Depends poor Polly's life.
Page 164 - He began on it ; and when first he mentioned it to Swift, the Doctor did not much like the project. As he carried it on, he showed what he wrote to both of us, and we now and then gave a correction, or a word or two of advice ; but it was wholly of his own writing. When it was done, neither of us thought it would succeed. We showed it to Congreve ; who, after reading it over, said, it would either take greatly, or be damned confoundedly.
Page 198 - Through the whole piece you may observe such a similitude of manners in high and low life, that it is difficult to determine whether (in the fashionable vices) the fine gentlemen imitate the gentlemen of the road, or the gentlemen of the road the fine gentlemen.
Page 6 - Opera has been acted now thirty-six times, and was as full the last night as the first; and as yet there is not the least probability of a thin audience : though there is a discourse about the town, that the directors of the royal academy of music design to solicit against its being played on the outlandish opera days, as it is now called.

Bibliographic information