Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 15, 2010 - Political Science
Why do some societies fare well, and others poorly, at reducing the risk of early death? Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America finds that the public provision of basic health care and other inexpensive social services has reduced mortality rapidly even in tough economic circumstances, and that political democracy has contributed to the provision and utilization of such social services, in a wider range of ways than is sometimes recognized. These conclusions are based on case studies of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Indonesia, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand, as well as on cross-national comparisons involving these cases and others.
 

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Contents

1 Incomes Capabilities and Mortality Decline
1
2 Democracy Spending Services and Survival
23
 A Healthy Democracy
65
 The Pinochet Paradox
94
 Big Welfare State Slow Infant Mortality Decline
120
 From Laggard to Leader in Basic Health Service Provision
149
 From Poor but Healthy to Wealthy and Healthy
181
 Small Welfare State Fast Infant Mortality Decline
203
 Democratization Speeds Infant Mortality Decline
228
 Authoritarianism Slows Infant Mortality Decline
254
11 Wealth Health Democracy and Mortality
278
Appendix Tables
311
Works Cited
331
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About the author (2010)

James W. McGuire is a professor in the Department of Government at Wesleyan University, Connecticut. He specializes in comparative politics with a regional focus on Latin America and East Asia and a topical focus on democracy and public health. He is the author of Peronism without Pern: Unions, Parties, and Democracy in Argentina and is a recipient of Wesleyan's Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching.

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