Selections from the Poetical Works of Robert Montgomery: With Introductory Remarks, and an Appendix, Containing Extracts from Satires, Notes &c

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C. Mason, 1836 - Christian life - 324 pages
 

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Page 317 - The same applies to opinions, good, bad, or indifferent, of persons in conversation or correspondence. These do not interrupt, but they soil, the current of my mind. I am sensitive enough, but not till I am...
Page 74 - Ascension into heaven is a plain local translation of Christ according to his manhood from the lower to the higher parts of the world. Session at the right hand of God is the actual exercise of that regency and dominion wherein the manhood of Christ is joined and matched with the Deity of the Son of God.
Page 75 - Christ according to his manhood from the lower to the higher parts of the world. Session at the right hand of God is the actual exercise of that regency and dominion wherein the manhood of Christ is joined and matched with the Deity of the Son of God. Not that his manhood was before without the possession of the same power, but because the full use thereof was suspended till that humility which had been before as a veil to hide and conceal majesty were laid aside. After his...
Page 233 - A soulless thing, a spirit of the woods, He loves to commune with the fields and floods.
Page 231 - The sea has heard it ; coiling up with dread, Myriads of mortals flash from out her bed ! The graves fly open, and, with awful strife, The dust of ages startles into life! All who have breathed, or moved, or seen, or felt; All they around whose cradles kingdoms knelt; Tyrants and warriors, who were throned in blood: The great and mean, the glorious and the good, Are raised from every isle, and land, and tomb, To hear the changeless and eternal doom.
Page 221 - So sweetly prattling in his cherub glee, Leers on his lifeless sire with infant wile, And plays and plucks him for a parent's smile ! But who, upon the battle-wasted plain, Shall count the faint, the gasping, and the slain ? Angel of Mercy ! ere the blood-fount chill, And the brave heart be spiritless and still, Amid the havoc thou art hovering nigh, To calm each groan, and close each dying eye, And waft the spirit to that halcyon shore, Where war's loud thunders lash the winds no more ! ROBERT MONTGOMERY.
Page 46 - The comparison of a violet, bright with the dew, to a woman's eyes, is as perfect as a comparison can be. Sir Walter's lines are part of a song addressed to a woman at daybreak, when the violets are bathed in dew : and the comparison is therefore peculiarly natural and graceful.
Page 59 - Ye quenchless stars ! so eloquently bright, Untroubled sentries of the shadowy night, While half the world is lapp'd in downy dreams, And round the lattice creep your midnight beams, How sweet to gaze upon your placid eyes, In lambent beauty looking from the skies.
Page 79 - O, who shall paint Him ? Let the sweetest tone That ever trembled on the harps of heaven Be discord ; let the chanting seraphim, Whose anthem is eternity, be dumb; For praise and wonder, adoration, all Melt into muteness, ere they soar to thee, Thou sole perfection ! theme of countless worlds !
Page 72 - Go, child of darkness, see a Christian die ; No horror pales his lip, or rolls his eye ; No dreadful doubts, or dreamy terrors, start The hope Religion pillows on his heart, When with a dying hand he waves adieu To all who love so well, and weep...

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