The Punjaub Railway. A Selection from Official Correspondence Regarding the Introduction of Railways Into the Punjaub, with Map of Scinde and the Punjaub ...

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W.H. Allen and Company, 1857 - Railroads - 37 pages
 

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Page 37 - SIR. I have received and laid before the Court of Directors of the East India Company, your letter dated the...
Page 28 - Chenab, and a, part of that belonging to the Jhelum, will be diverted to the Umritsur and Mooltan Railway; and if the Railway up to Peshawur should have been established, then almost all the traffic of the Jhelum, and much of the Indus traffic would proceed to Lahore, and thence down the Rail to Mooltan. The present means of navigation being wretched, and the rivers being difficult, the existing water traffic would preferentially take the Railway, provided always that the cost of transit be cheap....
Page iii - Carlisle Railway in the parish of Kendal in the county of Westmoreland to the NorthWestern Railway at or near Ingleton in the West Riding of the county of York, with a branch therefrom ; and for other purposes.
Page 11 - I have the honour to transmit herewith for the information of the Right Honorable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, copies 1 Admirals
Page 31 - ... country is fairly cultivated, and generally level. It offers no engineering obstacles. But there would be three or four small streams, and one canal to be bridged. As regards material, the iron would come from England; timber and wood of the best quality is obtainable from the Hills by water carriage ; fire-wood exists in the utmost abundance : kunkur would be generally procurable for at least half the distance; masonry would not be much needed; if it were, there are ample facilities for brickmaking;...
Page 28 - The united traffic of the rivers up and down by (the greater part, say four-fifths, being down traffic), as ascertained by registration of boats at the junction point, Mithun Kote, on the Indus, is not less than 700,000 maunds, or 35,000 tons per annum. Now if the rates of carriage by rail should be kept low, so as to attract commodities which can only afford to pay for cheap transit, then it may be certainly presumed, that of the above quantity all that pertains to the Sutlej, the Ravee, and the...
Page 25 - ... the first or easterly division, the stream of trade and wealth must ever flow down the valley of the Ganges to the natural outlet of Calcutta. In the second or westerly division, if the power of art and science be brought to the aid of nature, the commerce could follow the direction of the...
Page 27 - Umritsir, and other parts of the country between Delhi to the North-Western Provinces Frontier, and the regions beyond it, which now come from Calcutta or from Bombay by land, would proceed to Kurrachee, and thence upwards by rail. But besides the noble traffic above indicated, which is of general as well as local interest, there is already a traffic of some magnitude between the Punjaub and Kurrachee. So strong is the tendency of trade towards the natural port and outlet, that large quantities of...
Page 6 - Great Britain are to be permanent, they must be rendered so by a mutuality of interests, by the material and civilising influences of expanding commerce. The great battle of the country for the tranquillity of Central Asia must be fought at Manchester and Liverpool [hear, hear].
Page 27 - Europe on the one hand, and of Central Asia on the other. To this city there come the choicest Asiatic products, the wool of Thibet, the shawls of Cashmere, the dried fruit and spices of Affghanistan, the carpets of Turkey, the silk of Bokhara, the furs and skins of Tartary, the chintzes and leather of Russia.

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