A Classical Dictionary; Containing a Copious Account of All the Proper Names Mentioned in Ancient Authors:: With the Value of Coins, Weights, and Measures, Used Among the Greeks and Romans; and a Chronological Table

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1820 - Classical dictionaries - 847 pages
 

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Page 108 - AstrEea ; but the wickedness and impiety of mankind drove her to heaven in the brazen and iron ages, and she was placed among the constellations of the zodiac, under the name of Virgo.
Page 235 - Argos, by Eurydice. She was confined in a brazen tower by her father, who had been told by an oracle, that his daughter's son would put him to death. His endeavours to prevent Danae from becoming a mother proved...
Page 380 - Some peacocks generally sat by her, and a cuckoo often perched on her sceptre, while Iris behind her displayed the thousand colours of her beautiful rainbow. She is sometimes carried through the air in a rich chariot drawn by peacocks.
Page 337 - ... was visited by a disorder which obliged him to apply to the oracle of Delphi for relief. The coldness with which the Pythia received him irritated him, and he resolved to plunder Apollo's temple and carry away the sacred tripod. Apollo opposed him, and a severe conflict was begun, which nothing but the interference of Jupiter with his thunderbolts could have prevented. He was upon this told by the oracle that...
Page 414 - LUCRKTIA, a celebrated Roman lady, daughter of Lucretius, and wife of Tarquinius Collatinus. Her accomplishments proved fatal to her, and the praises which a number of young nobles at Ardea, among whom were Collatinus and the sons of Tarquin, bestowed upon the domestic virtues of their wives at home, were productive of a revolution in the state.
Page 152 - The public assemblies were held there, and the officers of state chosen, and audience given to foreign ambassadors. It was adorned with statues, columns, arches, and porticoes, and its pleasant situation made it very frequented.
Page 32 - Locutius, a deity to whom the Romans erected an altar, from the following circumstance: one of the common people, called Ceditius, informed the tribunes that, as he passed one night through one of the streets of the city, a voice more than human, issuing from above Vesta's temple, told him that Rome would soon be attacked by the Gauls. His information was neglected ; but...
Page 175 - CHAOS, a rude and shapeless mass of matter, and confused assemblage of inactive elements, wliich, as the poets suppose, pre-existed the formation of the world, and from which the universe was formed by the hand and power of a superior being. This doctrine was first established by Hesiod, from whom the succeeding poets have copied it ; and it is probable that it was obscurely drawn from the account of Moses, by being copied from the annals of Sanchoniathon, whose age is fixed antecedent to the si«ge...
Page 416 - It was usual first to sacrifice two goats and a dog, and to touch with a bloody knife the foreheads of two illustrious youths, who always were obliged to smile while they were touched. The blood was wiped away with soft wool dipped in milk. After this the skins of the victims were cut into thongs, with which whips were made for the youths. With these whips the youths ran about the streets all naked except the middle, and whipped freely all those whom they met. Women in particular...
Page 233 - ... who was the companion of his confinement They took their flight in the air from Crete ; but the heat of the sun melted the wax on the wings of Icarus, whose flight...

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