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which are above livings :- those good things for which the appearance of something is by somebody to be done, and those still better things for which not even that is by any body to be done.

The life then of this Excellent person being in her gold, -taking away her gold, you take away her life: her life you divest her of, and instead of it put on death : here then is Thanasia. But that death is a most easy one: an easier one was never imagined in Sybaris. Here then is Euthanasia. No spasm : no convulsion : a death which no man will feel :- :-a death for which all men will be the better, and scarce a man the worse.

Yes :—this will indeed be,-if any one there ever was (in the gravest and most important sense), a death unto sin : yea, and at the same instant a new life unto righteousness.

Of the money, which upon this plan would by degrees find its way into the proposed fund,—the quantity applicable to the exigencies of the public—the benefit which accordingly would thus be produced in the shape of economy-would not be inconsiderable.

But in this case even that benefit is but a secondary one. In regard to religious doctrine and instruction, no immediate or certain change, it is true, would (it has been seen) be—because, consistently with liberty and sincerity, no such change could be made by it. But the great mischief of which the system is the perennial source-the mischief done by it to morality and good government--would be cleared away: to morality, by the perpetual dominion which has been exercised by the above-mentioned confederacy of vices : to good government, by the support, which, through the medium of corrupt and corruptive in. fluence, has been seen given to despotism. • of the produce of the fund thus created, the most ob. vious application is the transfer of it to the Sinking Fund. But to this it would be but as a drop to the ocean : and of no such addition can any expectation have ever been entertained by the public creditors.

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For public instruction at large, other funds there are, and those amply sufficient,-if of the masses absorbed by the peculation of trustees, and of those misapplied by the ignorance of former ages, a proper application be now made to that use. To the Education Committee of the House of Commons, honest and intelligent men look on this occasion with wistful, yet-considering on whom every thing ultimately depends- little expecting eyes.

Relief from taxes—this is the application which, in the state to which the country has been reduced, presents a claim superior to every other.

From taxes ? Good. But from what taxes ? From those of which, while the apparent mischief is greatest, the real mischief is least ?-From a tax on intoxicating liquors, for example :—No: but from those taxes which are in the contrary case :-of which the prohibitory effect operates on those benefits, the value of which is at the same time greatest in reality, and, by contingency or remoteness, rendered least obvious, or least acutely sensible, to unscrutinizing eyes : taxes prohibitive of health, justice, communication : communication for supply of commercial wants-communication, for supply to the most crying of all wants-remedy against misrule.

Under what tax will men be least impatient ? this bas been the question—this the only question—with the man of finance. Under what tax will men's sufferings be least ? -under what greatest? This (says he to himself) is their concern, not mine. Thus it is that the activity of power has taken its direction from the undisguised object of its contempt-the impatience of ignorance. “ Ignorant impa

tience of taxation !" as is, supposing in their breasts the least spark of feeling for a nation's misery, the ignorance of those by whom, could ever have been exceeded by the ignorance of those on whom the taxes have been imposed!

By a supply such as that here in question—a supply which, how moderate soever it may prove, would come from a quarter to which official expectation can scarcely have ever directed itself—is presented one of those rare occasions, on which, on the field of taxation, it is possible for inveterate error to receive any considerable remedy. But on this, as on every other quarter of the field of political abuse, where?-where, alas ! are the hands, to which remedy can be looked for with any ray of hope ?

vious application is the transfer of it to the Sinking Fund. But to this it would be but as a drop to the ocean: and of no such addition can any expectation have ever been entertained by the public creditors.

For public instruction at large, other funds there are, and those amply sufficient,--if of the masses absorbed by the peculation of trustees, and of those misapplied by the ignorance of former ages, a proper application be now made to that use. To the Education Committee of the House of Commons, honest and intelligent men look on this occasion with wistful, yet-considering on whom every thing ultimately depends little expecting eyes.

Relief from taxes—this is the application which, in the state to which the country has been reduced, presents a claim superior to every other.

From taxes ? Good. But from what taxes ? From those of which, while the apparent mischief is greatest, the real mischief is least ?-From a tax on intoxicating liquors, for example ?—No: but from those taxes which are in the contrary case :-of which the prohibitory effect operates on those benefits, the value of which is at the same time greatest in reality, and, by contingency or remoteness, rendered least obvious, or least acutely sensible, to unscrutinizing eyes : taxes prohibitive of health, justice, communication : communication for supply of commercial wants-communication, for supply to the most crying of all wants-remedy against misrule.

Under what tax will men be least impatient ? this has been the question—this the only question-with the man of finance. Under what tax will men's sufferings be least? -under what greatest ? This (says he to himself) is their concern, not mine. Thus it is that the activity of power has taken its direction from the undisguised object of its contempt--the impatience of ignorance. “ Ignorant impa

tience of taxation!” as if, supposing in their breasts the least spark of feeling for a nation's misery, the ignorance of those by whom, could ever have been exceeded by the ignorance of those on whom the taxes have been imposed!

By a supply such as that here in question—a supply which, how moderate soever it may prove, would come from a quarter to which official expectation can scarcely have ever directed itself—is presented one of those rare occasions, on which, on the field of taxation, it is possible for inveterate error to receive any considerable remedy. But on this, as on every other quarter of the field of political abuse, where :-—where, alas! are the hands, to which remedy can be looked for with any ray of hope ?

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