The Lives of Donne, Wotton, Hooker, Hebert, and Sanderson, Volume 2

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Hilliard, Gray, 1832
 

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Page 331 - Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill: But their strong nerves at last must yield; They tame but one another still: Early or late They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath, When they, pale captives, creep to death. The garlands wither on your brow, Then boast no more your mighty deeds; Upon Death's purple altar now See, where the victor-victim bleeds: Your heads must come To the cold tomb; Only the actions of the just Smell sweet, and blossom...
Page 33 - ... not an open enemy, that hath done me this dishonour : for then I could have borne it.
Page 105 - ... of God for any other reason, but to live to finish his three remaining books of Polity ; and then, Lord, let thy servant depart in peace;" which was his usual expression.
Page 161 - ... he had many conflicts with himself, whether he should return to the painted pleasures of a Courtlife, or betake himself to a study of Divinity, and enter into Sacred Orders, to which his dear mother had often persuaded him. These were such conflicts, as they only can know, that have endured them ; for ambitious desires, and the outward glory of this -world, are not easily laid aside ; but at last God inclined him to put on a resolution to serve at his altar.
Page 198 - The poor man blessed him for it, and he blessed the poor man : and was so like the good Samaritan, that he gave him money to refresh both himself and his horse, and told him that, " if he loved himself, he should be merciful to his beast.
Page 94 - And after these days Elisabeth his wife conceived; and she hid herself five months, saying, Thus hath the Lord done unto me in the days wherein he looked upon me, to take away my reproach among men.
Page 215 - Lord, forsake me not now my Strength faileth me, but grant me mercy for the merits of my Jesus. And now, Lord — Lord, now receive my soul.
Page 70 - That the way of nature, this the way of grace. The end of that way, salvation merited, presupposing the righteousness of men's works; their righteousness, a natural ability to do them ; that ability, the goodness of God which created them in such perfection; but the end of this way, salvation bestowed upon men as a gift, presupposing not their righteousness, but the forgiveness of their unrighteousness, justification; their justification, not their natural ability...
Page 35 - God's disfavor; for he was a virtuous man. I shall not yet give the like testimony of his wife, but leave the reader to judge by what follows. But to this house Mr. Hooker came so wet, so weary, and weather-beaten, that he was never known to express more passion than against a friend that dissuaded him from footing it to London, and for finding him no easier an horse, — supposing the horse trotted when he did not; — and at this time also, such a faintness and fear possessed him, that he would...
Page 33 - ... university, free from selfends, which the friendships of age usually are not. And in this sweet, this blessed, this spiritual amity, they went on for many years, and, as the holy Prophet saith, so " they took sweet counsel together, and walked in the house of God as friends.

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