The Eastern Mysteries: An Encyclopedic Guide to the Sacred Languages & Magickal Systems of the World

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Llewellyn Worldwide, 2000 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 614 pages
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UNLOCK THE MEANING OF EASTERN MAGICK

In scope and clarity, there is no book that can compare to The Eastern Mysteries. This reissue of David Allen Hulse's landmark work is the one book all students of the occult must own. It catalogs and distills, in hundreds of tables of secret symbolism, the true import of each ancient Eastern magickal tradition. Each chapter is a key that unlocks the meaning behind one of the magickal languages. Through painstaking research and analysis, Hulse has accomplished an unprecedented feat -- that of reconstructing the basic underlying systems that form the vast legacy of mystery traditions.

The real genius of this accomplishment is that it is presented in a way that is immediately understandable and usable. Although the book deals with many foreign scripts, ancient tongues, and lost symbols, it is designed for the beginning student. Included is a wealth of cross references, excellent introductory material and overviews, an extensive annotated bibliography, and -- new to this edition -- a complete index.

 

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Contents

First KeyCuneiform
3
Second KeyHebrew
13
Key 2Hebrew
14
Key 2Hebrew contd
121
The 32 Paths of Wisdom
123
Third KeyArabic
179
Key 3Arabic
182
Key 3Arabic contd
210
Key 5Tibetan
279
The Eastern Tattva System
286
Key 5Tibetan contd
290
Sixth KeyChinese
335
Key 6Chinese
337
Key 6Chinese contd
362
Key 6Chinese contd
401
Additional Stroke Count Metaphors of Japanese
554

Fourth KeySanskrit
223
The Chakras
254
Fifth KeyTibetan
277
Annotated Essential Bibliography
581
Index
607
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

From an early age, David Allen Hulse diligently studied the alphabets of the ancient world. As a child, David possessed a great affinity for the alphabets of Egypt, Phoenicia, and Greece.In college, a reading of MacGregor Mathers' Kabbalah Unveiled opened up the Hebrew alphabet-number technique of Qabalistic research. After Hebrew, many other ancient languages were decoded and studied, including Sanskrit and Tibetan. In 1979, a discovery led to the need to capture the extent of all prior Quabalistic research into one great reference work. Research is still being carried out to discover new definitions for the number series as well as new magickal systems.

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