The Miscellaneous Works of the Right Honourable Sir James Mackintosh: Three Volumes, Complete in One

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Carey and Hart, 1848 - Ethics - 580 pages
 

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Page 321 - ... a Liberty to Tender Consciences and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matters of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Page 27 - of LAW there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world : all things in heaven and earth do her homage, — the very least, as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power ; both angels and men, and creatures of what condition soever ; though each in a different sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent, admiring her as the mother of their peace and joy.
Page 393 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Page 256 - Pour round her path a stream of living light ; And gild those pure and perfect realms of rest, Where virtue triumphs, and her sons are blest ! SAMUEL ROGERS.
Page 136 - Truth is the cry of all, but the game of a few. Certainly, where it is the chief passion, it doth not give way to vulgar cares and views ; nor is it contented with a little ardour in the early time of life ; active, perhaps, to pursue, but not so fit to weigh and revise. He that would make a real progress in knowledge must dedicate his age as well as youth, the later growth as well as first fruits, at the altar of Truth.
Page 57 - ... except every one of them could put into his one head all their several wits, he alone in so weighty a matter was unmeet to make his grace answer.
Page 16 - And, like th' old Hebrews, many years did stray, In deserts but of small extent, Bacon, like Moses, led us forth at last : The barren wilderness he past ; Did on the very border stand Of the blest promis'd land ; And from the mountain's top of his exalted wit, Saw it himself, and shew'd us it.
Page 256 - That oft arrest the wondering stranger's sail. Long have ye heard the narratives of age, The battle's havoc, and the tempest's rage; Long have ye known Reflection's genial ray Gild the calm close of Valour's various day.
Page 75 - I do nobody no harm, I say none harm, I think none harm, but wish everybody good. And if this be not enough to keep a man alive, in good faith I long not to live.
Page 358 - I will keep this paper. I will not part with it. I will remember you that have signed it." "God's will be done,

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