Teaching Reading to Black Adolescent Males: Closing the Achievement Gap

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Stenhouse Publishers, Jan 1, 2005 - Education - 165 pages

For those who truly wish to leave no child behind, the racial achievement gap in literacy is one of the most difficult issues in education today, and nowhere does it manifest itself more perniciously than in the case of black adolescent males.

Approaching the problem from the inside, Alfred Tatum brings together his various experiences as a black male student, middle school teacher working with struggling black male readers, reading specialist in an urban elementary school, and staff developer in classrooms across the nation. His new book, Teaching Reading to Black Adolescent Males offers teachers and schools a way to reconceptualize literacy instruction for those who need it most.

Alfred bridges the connections among theory, instruction, and professional development to create a roadmap for better literacy achievement. He presents practical suggestions for providing reading strategy instruction and assessment that is explicit, meaningful, and culturally responsive, as well as guidelines for selecting and discussing nonfiction and fiction texts with black males.

The author's first-hand insights provide middle school and high school teachers, reading specialists, and administrators with new perspectives to help schools move collectively toward the essential goal of literacy achievement for all.

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Contents

LITERACY DEVELOPMENT IN BLACK
TURMOIL AND THE PROMISE OF READING 17
BLACK MALES AND THE READING
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Alfred Tatum is an assistant professor in the Department of Literacy Education at Northern Illinois University.

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