Life of Napoleon Bonaparte

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G. Routledge and sons, 1880 - 368 pages
 

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Page 342 - The allied powers having proclaimed that the Emperor Napoleon is the only obstacle to the re-establishment of peace in Europe, the Emperor Napoleon, faithful to his oath, declares that he renounces for himself and his heirs, the thrones of France and Italy, and that there is no personal sacrifice, even that of life, which he is not ready to make for the interests of France.
Page 360 - I come, like Themistocles, to throw myself upon the hospitality of the British people. I put myself under the protection of their laws ; which 1 claim from your Royal Highness, as the most powerful, the most constant, and the most generous of my enemies.
Page 222 - I told him that it was very far from his majesty's intention. He then proceeded to count Markoff and the chevalier Azara, who were standing together at a little distance from me, and said to them, ' The English wish for war; but if they are the first to draw the sword, I shall be the last to sheathe it. They have no regard for treaties : we must henceforth cover them with shame.
Page 160 - SOLDIERS, The president of the council of Five Hundred declares to you, that the majority of that council is at this moment held in terror by a few representatives of the people, who are armed with stilettos, and who surround the tribune, threatening their colleagues with death, and maintaining most atrocious discussions.
Page 255 - The British islands were to be considered as in a state of blockade by all the Continent. All correspondence or trade with England was forbidden under most severe penalties. All articles of English manufacture, or produce of the British colonies, were considered as contraband. Property of every kind belonging to British subjects, wherever found, was declared lawful prize. All letters to and from England to be detained and opened at the post-offices.
Page 357 - Frenchmen !— In commencing war for maintaining the national independence I relied on the union of all efforts, of all wills, and the concurrence of all the national authorities. I had reason to hope for success, and I braved all the declarations of the Powers against rne.
Page 197 - The consular court was, in general, extremely irreligious ; nor could it be expected to be otherwise, being composed chiefly of those who had assisted in the annihilation of all religious worship in France, and of men who, having passed their lives in camps, had of'tener entered a church in Italy to carry off a painting than to hear the mass.
Page 360 - Monsieur Las Cases, you will recollect that I am not authorized to stipulate as to the reception of Buonaparte in England, but that he must consider himself entirely at the disposal of his Royal Highness the Prince Regent.' He answered, ' I am perfectly aware of that, and have already acquainted the Emperor with what you said on the subject.
Page 350 - The powers consequently declare, that Napoleon Buonaparte has placed himself without the pale of civil and social relations, and that as an enemy and disturber of the tranquillity of the world, he has rendered himself liable to public vengeance.
Page 166 - May, and marched, with about 36,000 men and forty pieces of cannon, up the Great St. Bernard, which had till then been considered impracticable for the passage of an army, and especially for artillery. The cannons were dismounted, put into hollow trunks of trees, and dragged by the soldiers ; the carriages were taken to pieces, and carried on mules. The French army descended to Aosta, turned the fort of Bard, and found itself in the plains of...

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