The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 81

Front Cover
Atlantic Monthly Company, 1898 - American literature
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 436 - stars or satellites, which revolve about Mars, whereof the innermost is distant from the centre of the primary exactly three of his diameters, and the outermost five." In one of his satires, Voltaire also represents an imaginary traveler from Sirius as making a similar discovery. These curious prognostications were at length verified by
Page 482 - Faith's journeys end in welcome to the weary, And heaven, the heart's true home, will come at last. Angels of Jesus, Angels of light, Singing to welcome The pilgrims of the night
Page 597 - Jaq. God give you good morrow, master Parson. "Hoi. Master Parson, quasi pers-on. An if one should be pierced, which is the one ? " Cost. Marry, master schoolmaster, he that is likest to a hogshead. " Hoi. Piercing a hogshead ! a good lustre of conceit in a turf of earth,
Page 482 - we are gathered together here in the sight of God, and in the face of this company, to join together this man and this woman in holy matrimony.
Page 43 - If after the manner of men I have fought with beasts at Ephesus, what advantageth it me, if the dead rise not ?
Page 465 - For in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness.
Page 673 - that intolerable pedant asked, " • What does it mean ? ' " ' Must a name mean something ? ' Alice asked doubtfully. " ' Of course it must,' Humpty Dumpty said, with a short laugh. ' My name means the shape I am, — and a good handsome shape
Page 13 - Keep not standing fix'd and rooted, Briskly venture, briskly roam ; Head and hand, where'er thou foot it, And stout heart are still at home. In each land the sun does visit We are gay, whatever betide
Page 230 - trust myself to describe its fury. The entire corps dramatique personated the elements, and tore the gallant ship in twain, while Sir Patrick shouted in the teeth of the gale, — " ' O whaur will I get a gude sailor To tak' my helm in hand, Till I get up to the tall topmast To see if I can spy land ? ' " I knew the words a trifle better

Bibliographic information