Page images
PDF
EPUB

The electric soul of the wire
Quivered like sentient fire.
The soul of the woman who stood
Face to face with the flood
Answered to the shock
Like the eternal rock.

For she stayed
With her hand on the wire,

Unafraid,
Flashing the wild word down
Into the lowar town.
Is there a lower yet and another?
Into the valley she and none other
Can hurl the warning cry:
Fly to the mountain! Fly!
The water from Conemaugh
Has opened its awful jaw.
The dam is wide
On the mountain side."

“Fly for your life, oh, fly!" They said. She lifted her noble head : “I can stay at my post and die."

Face to face with duty and death,
Dear is the drawing of human breath.
"Steady, my hand! Hold fast
To the trust upon thee cast.
Steady, my wire! Go, say
That death is on the way.
Steady, strong wire! Go, save!
Grand is the power you have!”

Grander the soul that can stand
Behind the trembling hand,
Grander the woman who dares.
Glory her high name wears.
This message is my last!
Shot over the wire, and passed
To the listening ear of the land.
The mountain and the strand
Reverberate the cry:
Fly for your lives, oh, fly!
I stay at my post and die.
The torrent took her. God knows all.
Fiercely the savage currents fall
To muttering calm. Men count their dead.
The June sky smileth overhead.
God's will we neither read, nor guess.
Poorer by one more hero less
We bow the head, and clasp the hand:-
Teach us, although we die, to stand."

ELIZABETH STUART PHELPS. - The Independent.

Yet I shall fancy till my grave
Your lives to mine a lesson gave;
If lesson none an image, then,
Impeaching self-conceit in men
Who put their confidence alone
In what they call the Seen and Known.
How seen? How known? As through your

glass
Our wavering apparitions pass
Perplexingly, then subtly wrought
To some quite other thing by thought.
Here shall my resolution be;
The shadow of the mystery
Is haply wholesomer for eyes
That cheat us to be overwise,
And I am happy in my right
To love God's darkness as His light.

JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL. -Atlantic Monthly, July, 1889.

THE BROKEN HARP.

If this now silent harp could wake,

How pure, how strong, how true
The tender strain its chords would make

of love and grief for you!
But like my heart, though faithful long

By you cast forth to pain,
This hushed and frozen voice of song

Must never live again.

Yet haply when your fancy strays

O'er unregarded things,
And half in dream your gentle gaze

Falls on its shattered strings,
Some loving impulse may endear

Your memories of the past, And if for me you shed one tear

I think 'twould wake at last:

Wake with a note so glad, so clear,

So lovely, so complete,
That birds on wing would pause to hear

Its music wild and sweet;
And you would know-alas, too late!-

How tender and how true
Is this fond heart that hugs its fate-.
To die for love and you.

WILLIAM WINTER. - Harper's Magazine, May, 1889.

CONEMAUGH.

"Fly to the mountain! fly!"
Terribly rang the cry.

380

JAMES RUS

SEVET

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Who is the poet? In that sweet seas Though with the His birthday will Though all the sh The bloom and fr He is the poet wh The secret hidden Whom June's wai

fills Whose spirit “dar Whom noble deed And lend his vers Who drinks the w That wind and

dreams For whom the un Its fairer flowers He looks a morta He seems an ang Behold the poet! Whom Elmwood's

[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

1

DL The cit met of St labai 22-33 ST.02. Image, Gamerkanser assess which is geceras de

case to ibat of the sea, some basis STAT. Xire carele: observation cons

estres.ss exact, though stills S3 reputatica, and gires zest at. pod draagbi

F.LT In his great lecture Ctrece." Wendei Philips always repos. szezas of a poem on Ireland so sadade ssar it seemed the very moan of ads se ni It was long a question in ibis caer was the author of the poem. Mr. F S s not know, until the knowledge was to him in Canada by Mr. Thomas Fe's Joha, nephew and namesake of the autre interesting information is given by Vic Stewart, Jr., editor of the Quiet CFC

I him the entire poem. I sair Vr. Frana

**

A word, an

In rainbc A word, an

And all a

A word, an

Remorse A word, an

From son

Stewart writes: "When Wendei PL. 218222scze. on O'Connell in St. John, N. B. Marcs,

he quoted a verse of the poet · Ot, Ireba* osea.sadacd country,'etc. He was at that time

seaduste oat my with the author's name. In the access: 20."

ever, sat a friend of mine, Mr. Tbcexfi

who, by an odd coincidence. prond: "1. berpoezs tr Vr.

nephew of the bard, and namesakes

Mr. Phillips dined with me on Surar Ld Cenkscade's sosiacous! and I told him the game of the den

Les 13 MAZE OF seemed pleased, and asked me if i u.

k vas

Words gent

Kind, tru What powe

To help a

Words, ang

False, bit Ye fester ra

Of Satan

ne the only copy in America of 'The Plagues land,' by his uncle, Thomas Furlong, pub

in 1824, where I found the poem. I had it ted in the St. John Daily News of March 20, and forwarded copies to Mr. Phillips. must have gone astray, for towards the end ie, 1877, he wrote to me from Boston, and if I remembered the incident, and begged send him a copy of the poem. I borrowed tle volume from Mr. Furlong to verify the d newspaper copy. This was on the 20th of

I sent the poem to Mr. Phillips, and locked ecious book in my safe. That night my was burned to the ground, and when the as pried open only charred remains of 'The s of Ireland' were found. Of course, Mr. g felt his loss keenly, as there was not ancopy extant, so far as he knew. There is tory. I thought it might interest you, as it gap in Wendell Phillips' lecture on the Liberator."

'P.

e

One of the most notable of the poems ied in the now famous Dial, was one with

· The Future is Better than the Past," has generally been ascribed to Emerson. w known to have been written not by EmerIt by Miss Eliza Thayer Clapp. As genernted it appears only in part. Rev. George ke, of Dedham, Mass., who has written the

by a small circle of readers, such as the Rev. W. H. Furness, who long kept a copy lying on his study table for constant reference. Miss Clapp has been an occasional contributor of poetry to the Christian Register, but she has published only a few pieces. The five poems of hers printed in the Dial of July, 1841, all appeared there because Emerson solicited their publication. The one which has been so often credited to him is worthy of his genius, and it embodies, as no other poem of the period does, the very heart and spirit of the transcendental movement."

BADGER. Elizabeth May Wyatt Badger was born in Palatka, Florida, September 27, 1841, and died at Gonzales, Texas, August 17, 1881.

DAVIS. Mrs. Mollie E. Moore Davis was born in Alabama, and now resides in New Orleans,

BIBLIOGRAPHY.

WORKS CONSULTED IN THE PREPARATION OF THIS

NUMBER OF "THE MAGAZINE OF POETRY.” DODGE, MARY MAPES. Along the way. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1879. 16mo, pp. 136.

IBID. Rhymes and Jingles. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1874. 16mo.

of the Dial, gives the poem in full. Mr. says of it in his history of the Dial: “The n the first number of the second volume, 1, · The Future is Better than the Past,' has een credited to Emerson. It first appeared is name in Hymns for the Church,' comy Rev. F. H. Hledge and Rev. F. D. Hunt

in 1853. Then it was so printed in the s of the Spirit,' by Rev. Samuel Longfellow v. Samuel Johnson, and in Dr. James Mar; . Hymns of Praise and Prayer.' It was ated to the Dial, at Emerson's request, by his most ardent disciples, Eliza Thayer Miss Clapp was born in Dorchester, Mass., s always lived a quiet home-life in that of Boston. The transcedental movement : new life to her Unitarian faith, and she

into its spirit with zeal, As a Sunday. eacher, having charge of a class of girls n to fifteen years of age, she prepared her ssons for their instruction. These were ed as 'Words in a Sunday-school.' A little 1845, another book, prepared in the same

was published as 'Studies in Religion.' ittle books were received with much favor

;

WHITING, CHARLES GOODRICH. The Saunterer. Boston: Ticknor and Company, 1886. 16mo, pp. II and 302.

COATES, FLORENCE EARLE. Miscellaneous poems.

CLARK, SIMEON TUCKER. Josephine and Other Poems, Boston: Rand and Avery, 1856. and Mis. cellaneous poems.

SMITH, MAY RILEY. A Gift of Gentians and Other Verses. New York: Anson D. F. Randolph and Company. n. d. C 1882

410, pp. 104. IRID), The Inn of Rest. Later Poems. New York: Anson D. F. Randolph and Company, 1888 460, PP. 35.

BLANDEN, CHARLES GRANGER. Tancred's Daugh. ter and Other Poems. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1889, 16mo, pp. 5 and 60.

REXDALE, ROBERT. Drifting Songs and Sketches. Portland, Me.: William H. Stevens and Company. n. d. c. 1886. 16mo, pp. 136.

TYNAN, KATHARINE. Louise de la Vallière, and Other Poems. Second Edition. London: Kegan Paul, Trench and Company, 1886. Small crown 8vo pp. 12 and 102,

[blocks in formation]

ume

WHITING, Of Mr. Whiting's poems “The Beautiful Stranger" has undoubtedly been most copied. It was recently published in Great Thoughts, a magazine published in London, and is now going the rounds of the English newspapers.

Coates. The poems by Mrs. Coates were published in Harper's Magazine, Lippincott's Magazine, and The Century.

Clark. “Coming and Going" was published first in The Aldine when under the editorship of R. H. Stoddard. “Love is Sweeter than Rest" was suggested by the last words of Henry Timrod, the poet.

* Cassie and I” and “ Barn-Yard Confab" are well adapted for elocutionary purposes.

SMITH. "If We Knew" originally appeared in the Rochester Union and Advertiser of February 23, 1867. It was one of Mrs. Smith's earliest poems. It has been set to music. “ Tired Mothers” was written for The Aldine. “My Mother" was first published in The Rochester Rural Home, and was written on the occasion of the seventy-third birthday of Mrs. Smith's mother. “Sometime” has been credited to Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson. Mrs. Smith says of it in “Waifs and their Authors,"“Yes, I wrote 'Sometime' on the cars one day, journeying from Chicago to Springfield.

It was suggested by the conversation of a lady and gentleman occupying seats in front of me. She held in her hand the portrait of a lovely child, and sometimes kissed it, and as she talked of the little one her tears fell like rain. I grew sober and sad, and drew my pencil from my pocket and wrote out my thoughts on a piece of crumpled paper.”

BLANDEN. “Pandean" and other poems by Mr. Blanden first appeared in The Century.

COOLBRITH. One of Miss Coolbrith's most famous poems, “The Poet," appeared in THE MAGAZINE OF POETRY, Vol. I, page 105.

O'MALLEY. “After-Life" appearing in the Current Poems of this number of THE MAGAZINE OF POETRY was written especially for its pages.

Powers. Poems, Early and Late," was published in Chicago in 1876.

COFFIN. Robert Barry Coffin was born at Hud. son, New York, in 1826. His great-grandfather was one of the original thirteen proprietors of the island of Nantucket. Mr. Coffin received a good classical education; and, after some experience as a clerk and a bookseller, formed a literary connection with Morris and Willis of the Home Journal (1858). In 1862 he accepted a position in the New York Custom-House. Several volumes in prose from his pen, and one in poetry (1872), have appeared under the name of Barry Gray. Mr. Coffin recently died. “Ships at Sea” is his best known poem.

CARLETON. “ When My Ship Went Down," from The Current, April 24, 1886. Tilton. “In God's Acre," from published vol.

" Thou and I." BLACKMORE, The old well of St. John, in the parish of Newton-Nottage, Glamorganshire, has a tide of its own, which is generally believed to run counter to that of the sea, some half mile away. More careful observation shows that the contrariety is less exact, though still sufficient to support its reputation, and gives zest to the cold, pellucid draught.

FURLONG. In his great lecture on “ Daniel O'Connell,” Wendell Phillips always repeated two stanzas of a poem on Ireland so sad and so hopeless that it seemed the very moan of a desparing spirit. It was long a question in this country who was the author of the poem. Mr. Phillips himself did not know, until the knowledge was given to him in Canada by Mr. Thomas Furlong of St. John, nephew and namesake of the author. This interesting information is given by Mr. George Stewart, Jr., editor of the Quebec Chronicle. Mr. Stewart writes: “When Wendell Phillips lectured on O'Connell in St. John, N. B., March 17, 1877. he quoted a verse of the poem 'Oh, Ireland, my country,' etc. He was at that time unacquainted with the author's name. In the audience, however, sat a friend of mine, Mr. Thomas Furlong, who, by an odd coincidence, proved to be the nephew of the bard, and namesake of the same. Mr. Phillips dined with me on Sunday, March 18, and I told him the name of the author. He seemed pleased, and asked me if I could get for him the entire poem. I saw Mr. Furlong, and he

lent me the only copy in America of 'The Plagues of Ireland,' by his uncle, Thomas Furlong, published in 1824, where I found the poem. I had it reprinted in the St. John Daily News of March 20, 1877, and forwarded copies to Mr. Phillips. These must have gone astray, for towards the end of June, 1877, he wrote to me from Boston, and asked if I remembered the incident, and begged me to send him a copy of the poem. I borrowed the little volume from Mr. Furlong to verify the printed newspaper copy. This was on the 20th of June, I sent the poem to Mr. Phillips, and locked the precious book in my safe. That night my house was burned to the ground, and when the safe was pried open only charred remains of “The Plagues of Ireland' were found. Of course, Mr. Furlong felt his loss keenly, as there was not an. other copy extant, so far as he knew. There is the history. I thought it might interest you, as it fills a gap in Wendell Phillips' lecture on the great Liberator."

by a small circle of readers, such as the Rev. W. H. Furness, who long kept a copy lying on his study table for constant reference. Miss Clapp has been an occasional contributor of poetry to the Christian Register, but she has published only a few pieces. The five poems of hers printed in the Dial of July, 1841, all appeared there because Emerson solicited their publication. The one which has been so often credited to him is worthy of his genius, and it embodies, as no other poem of the period does, the very heart and spirit of the transcendental movement.”

BADGER. Elizabeth May Wyatt Badger was born in Palatka, Florida, September 27, 1841, and died at Gonzales, Texas, August 17, 1881.

Davis. Mrs. Mollie E. Moore Davis was born in Alabama, and now resides in New Orleans,

BIBLIOGRAPHY.

WORKS CONSULTED IN THE PREPARATION OF THIS

NUMBER OF "THE MAGAZINE OF POETRY." Dodge, MARY MAPES. Along the way. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1879. 16mo, pp. 136.

Ibid. Rhymes and Jingles. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1874. 16mo. .

Clapp. One of the most notable of the poems published in the now famous Dial, was one with the title “ The Future is Better than the Past," which has generally been ascribed to Emerson. It is now known to have been written not by Emerson, but by Miss Eliza Thayer Clapp. As generally printed it appears only in part. Rev. George W. Cooke, of Dedham, Mass., who has written the history of the Dial, gives the poem in full. Mr. Couke says of it in his history of the Dial: “The poern in the first number of the second volume, entitled, The Future is Better than the Past,' has often been credited to Emerson. It first appeared over his name in ‘Hymns for the Church,' compiled by Rev. F. H. Hedge and Rev. F. D. Hunt. ington, in 1853. Then it was so printed in the · Hymns of the Spirit,' by Rev. Samuel Longfellow and Rev. Samuel Johnson, and in Dr. James Martineau's • Hymns of Praise and Prayer.' It was contributed to the Dial, at Emerson's request, by one of his most ardent disciples, Eliza Thayer Clapp. Viss Clapp was born in Dorchester, Mass., and has always lived a quiet home-life in that suburb of Boston. The transcedental movement brought new life to her Unitarian faith, and she entered into its spirit with zeal. As a Sundayschool teacher, having charge of a class of girls from ten to fifteen years of age, she prepared her own lessons for their instruction. These were published as · Words in a Sunday-school.' A little later, in 1845, another book, prepared in the same manner, was published as ‘Studies in Religion.' These little books were received with much favor

WHTING, CHARLES GOODRICH. The Saunterer. Boston: Ticknor and Company, 1856. 16mo, pp. II and 302.

COATES, FLORENCE EARLE. Miscellaneous poems.

CLARK, SIMEON TUCKER. Josephine and Other Poems. Boston: Rand and Avery, 1856. and Mis. cellaneous poems.

SMITH, VAY RILEY. A Gift of Gentians and Other Verses. New York: Anson D. F. Randolph and Company. n, d. C 1952.

410, pp. 101. Ibin). The Inn of Rest. Later Poems. New York: Anson D. F. Randolph and Company, 1888 4to, PP. 35.

BLANDEN, CHARLES GRANGER. Tancred's Daughter and Other Poems. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1889, 16mo, pp. 5 and 60.

REXDALE, ROBERT. Drifting Songs and Sketches. Portland, Me.: William H. Stevens and Company. n. d. c. 1886. 16mo, pp. 136.

TYNAN, KATHARINE. Louise de la Vallière, and Other Poems. Second Edition. London: Kegan Paul, Trench and Company, 1886. Small crown 8vo pp. 12 and 102,

« PreviousContinue »