Neverwhere

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Harper Collins, Jul 1, 1997 - Fiction - 352 pages
325 Reviews
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Richard Mayhew is an unassuming young businessman living in London, with a dull job and a pretty but demanding fiancee. Then one night he stumbles across a girl bleeding on the sidewalk. He stops to help her--and the life he knows vanishes like smoke.

Several hours later, the girl is gone too. And by the following morning Richard Mayhew has been erased from his world. His bank cards no longer work, taxi drivers won't stop for him, his hundred rents his apartment out to strangers. He has become invisible, and inexplicably consigned to a London of shadows and darkness a city of monsters and saints, murderers and angels, that exists entirely in a subterranean labyrinth of sewer canals and abandoned subway stations. He has fallen through the cracks of reality and has landed somewhere different, somewhere that is Neverwhere.

For this is the home of Door, the mysterious girl whom Richard rescued in the London Above. A personage of great power and nobility in this murky, candlelit realm, she is on a mission to discover the cause of her family's slaughter, and in doing so preserve this strange underworld kingdom from the malevolence that means to destroy it. And with nowhere else to turn, Richard Mayhew must now join the Lady Door's entourage in their determined--and possibly fatal--quest.

For the dread journey ever-downward--through bizarre anachronisms and dangerous incongruities, and into dusty corners of stalled time--is Richard's final hope, his last road back to a "real" world that is growing disturbingly less real by the minute.

If Tim Burton reimagined The Phantom of the Opera, if Jack Finney let his dark side take over, if you rolled the best work of Clive Barker, Peter Straub and Caleb Carr into one, you still would have something that fell far short of Neil Gaiman's NEVERWHERE. It is a masterful debut novel of darkly hypnotic power, and one of the most absorbing reads to come along in years.

 

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Excellent

User Review  - Shay E. - Overstock.com

Neil Gaiman is by far my favorite author.This is definitely one of his more interesting novels and I am so excited to own it for myself. If you like deeprooted storyline and mind blowing plots then this is the book for you! Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Sullywriter - LibraryThing

I enjoy watching zombie movies and The Walking Dead so I thought I'd try this chronicle of a zombie apocalypse. It's clever and imaginative, frequently gripping and gruesome but I guess prefer watching zombie apocalypses to reading about them. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
6
Section 3
25
Section 4
49
Section 5
62
Section 6
95
Section 7
120
Section 8
133
Section 13
216
Section 14
228
Section 15
242
Section 16
257
Section 17
273
Section 18
288
Section 19
302
Section 20
304

Section 9
147
Section 10
163
Section 11
178
Section 12
203
Section 21
318
Section 22
337
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Neil Gaiman is the author of many highly acclaimed and award-winning books for children and adults, including the New York Times #1 bestselling and Newbery Medal-winning novel The Graveyard Book and the bestselling Coraline, Stardust, and Odd and the Frost Giants. He is also the author of the picture books Blueberry Girl and Instructions, illustrated by Charles Vess; The Wolves in the Walls, The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish, and Crazy Hair, illustrated by Dave McKean; and The Dangerous Alphabet, illustrated by Gris Grimly. Originally from England, he now lives in the United States.

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