The Emergence of Genetic Rationality: Space, Time, and Information in American Biological Science, 1870-1920

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University of Washington Press, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 381 pages
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The emergence of genetic science has profoundly shaped how we think about biology. Indeed, it is difficult now to consider nearly any facet of human experience without first considering the gene. But this mode of understanding life is not, of course, transhistorical. Phillip Thurtle takes us back to the moment just before the emergence of genetic rationality at the turn of the twentieth century to explicate the technological, economic, cultural, and even narrative transformations necessary to make genetic thinking possible.

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Review: The Emergence of Genetic Rationality: Space, Time, and Information in American Biological Science, 1870-1920

User Review  - L** - Goodreads

Don't go into this book thinking a fast, fun, or easy read. Plan for a long, arduous haul with long, bloated, bulky, barely comprehensible sentences, a bizarre, awkward, and ill-conceived theoretical ... Read full review

Review: The Emergence of Genetic Rationality: Space, Time, and Information in American Biological Science, 1870-1920

User Review  - Pword - Goodreads

A new way of thinking about genetics. Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Phillip Thurtle is assistant professor in the Comparative History of Ideas Program, University of Washington.

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