An account of what appeared on opening the coffin of king Charles the first ... in St. George's chapel at Windsor ... 1813

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1813
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Page 7 - Esquire, and Sir Henry Halford. The Vault is covered by an arch, half a brick in thickness, is seven feet two inches in width, nine feet six inches in length, and four feet ten inches in height, and is situated in the centre of the choir, opposite the eleventh Knight's stall, on the Sovereign's side. On removing the pall, a plain leaden coffin, with no appearance of ever having been inclosed in wood, and bearing an inscription, " KING CHARLES, 1648," in large legible characters, on a scroll of lead...
Page 8 - At length the whole face was disengaged from its covering. The complexion of the skin of it was dark and discoloured. The forehead and temples had lost little, or nothing of their muscular substance ; the cartilage of the nose was gone ; but the left eye, in the first moment of exposure, was open and full, though it vanished, almost immediately : and the pointed beard, so characteristic of the reign of King Charles, was p 2 perfect.
Page 19 - ... time the corpse came to the West end of the Royal chapel, the black velvet pall was all white (the colour of innocency), being thick covered over with snow.
Page 8 - When the head had been entirely disengaged from the attachments which confined it, it was found to be loose, and, without any difficulty, was taken up and held to view. It was quite wet,* and gave a greenish red tinge to paper and to linen, which touched it. The back part of the scalp was entirely perfect, and had a remarkably fresh appearance; the pores of the skin being more distinct, as they usually are when soaked in moisture ; and the tendons and ligaments of the neck were of considerable...
Page 10 - After this examination of the head, which served every purpose in view, and without examining the body below the neck, it was immediately restored to its situation, the coffin was soldered up again, and the vault closed.
Page 8 - The forehead and temples had lost little or nothing of their muscular substance ; the cartilage of the nose was gone ; but the left eye, in the first moment of exposure, was open and full, though it vanished almost immediately : and the pointed beard, so characteristic of the period of the reign of King Charles, was perfect.
Page 9 - On holding up the head, to examine the place of separation from the body, the muscles of the neck had evidently retracted themselves considerably; and the fourth cervical vertebra was found to be cut through its substance transversely, leaving the surfaces of the divided portions perfectly smooth and even — an appearance which could have been produced only by a heavy blow inflicted with a very sharp instrument, and which furnished the last proof wanting to identify King Charles I.
Page 13 - The Duke of Richmond, the Marquis of Hertford, the Earls of Southampton and Lindsey...
Page 8 - It was difficult, at this moment, to withhold a declaration, that, notwithstanding its disfigurement, the countenance did bear a strong resemblance to the coins, the busts, and especially to the pictures of King Charles I., by Vandyke, by which it had been made familiar to us. It is true, that the minds of the spectators of this interesting sight were well prepared to receive this impression ; but it is also certain, that such a facility of belief had been occasioned, by the simplicity and truth...
Page 16 - Castle was the only person in his bedchamber) hear him at any time declare his mind concerning it. Nor was it in his lifetime a proper question for either of them to ask, notwithstanding they had oftentimes the opportunity, especially when his Majesty was bequeathing to his royal children and friends what is formerly related. Nor did the Bishop declare any thing concerning the place to Mr. Herbert, whidh doubtless he would upon Mr.

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