D. H. Lawrence: Late Essays and Articles, Volume 2

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Cambridge University Press, 2004 - Drama - 425 pages
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In his last years D. H. Lawrence often wrote for newspapers; he needed the money, and clearly enjoyed the work. He also wrote several substantial essays during the same period. This meticulously-edited collection brings together major essays such as Pornography and Obscenity and Lawrence's spirited Introduction to the volume of his Paintings; a group of autobiographical pieces, two of which are published here for the first time; and the articles Lawrence wrote at the invitation of newspaper and magazine editors. There are thirty-nine items in total, thirty-five of them deriving from original manuscripts; all were written between 1926 and Lawrence's death in March 1930. They are ordered chronologically according to the date of composition; each is preceded by an account of the circumstances in which it came to be published. The volume is introduced by a substantial survey of Lawrence's career as a writer responding directly to public interests and concerns.
 

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Contents

Note on the texts
3
Getting On
25
Making Love to Music
41
The Jeune Fille Wants to Know When She Asks Why?
69
All There
86
Matriarchy And If Women Here Supreme
102
Women Are So Cocksure
115
Lineend hyphenation
424
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

James T. Boulton is Emeritus Professor of English Studies at the University of Birmingham. He is General Editor of The Cambridge Edition of the Works of D. H. Lawrence and of the 8-volume Cambridge Edition of the Letters of D. H. Lawrence.