Complete Writings: Letterbook, Dialogue on Adam and Eve, Orations

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University of Chicago Press, Nov 1, 2007 - Social Science - 226 pages
Renowned in her day for her scholarship and eloquence, Isotta Nogarola (1418-66) remained one of the most famous women of the Italian Renaissance for centuries after her death. And because she was one of the first women to carve out a place for herself in the male-dominated republic of letters, Nogarola served as a crucial role model for generations of aspiring female artists and writers.

This volume presents English translations of all of Nogarola's extant works and highlights just how daring and original her convictions were. In her letters and orations, Nogarola elegantly synthesized Greco-Roman thought with biblical teachings. And striding across the stage in public, she lectured the Veronese citizenry on everything from history and religion to politics and morality. But the most influential of Nogarola's works was a performance piece, Dialogue on Adam and Eve, in which she discussed the relative sinfulness of Adam and Eve—thereby opening up a centuries-long debate in Europe on gender and the nature of woman and establishing herself as an important figure in Western intellectual history. This book will be a must read for teachers and students of Women's Studies as well as of Renaissance literature and history.
 

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Contents

V
27
VII
34
VIII
36
XI
37
XII
38
XIII
40
XIV
45
XVI
48
XXXIV
95
XXXV
96
XXXVI
97
XXXVII
98
XXXVIII
101
XL
107
XLIII
114
XLIV
128

XVII
53
XVIII
55
XIX
57
XX
59
XXII
63
XXIII
69
XXIV
73
XXVI
75
XXVII
77
XXVIII
80
XXIX
83
XXX
89
XXXI
92
XXXII
93
XXXIII
94
XLV
131
XLVI
138
XLVII
145
XLVIII
159
XLIX
163
L
167
LI
175
LII
178
LIII
187
LV
190
LVI
203
LVII
205
LVIII
211
LIX
221
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Page xvi - There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female,- for you are all one in Christ Jesus.

About the author (2007)

Margaret L. King is a professor of history at Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York.

Diana Robin is a professor emerita of classics at the University of New Mexico.

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