The Modern Part of an Universal History,: From the Earliest Account of Time

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S. Richardson, T. Osborne, C. Hitch, A. Millar, John Rivington, S. Crowder, P. Davey and B. Law, T. Longman, and C. Ware., 1764 - World history
 

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Page 3 - Town, unto the three and fortieth degree of northern latitude, if the said river doth extend so far northward; but if the said river shall not extend so far northward, then by the said river so far as it doth extend; and from the head of the said river, the eastern bounds...
Page 3 - The said land to extend westward five degrees in longitude, to be computed from the said eastern bounds, and the said lands to be bounded on the north by the beginning of the three and fortieth degree of northern latitude...
Page 17 - That the Assembly, when met. shall have power to choose a Speaker, and other their officers; to be judges of the qualifications and elections of their own members...
Page 459 - King cedes and makes over the whole to the said King, and to the Crown of Great Britain, and that in the most ample manner and form, without restriction, and without any liberty to depart from the said cession, and guaranty under any pretence, or to disturb Great Britain in the possessions above mentioned.
Page 3 - Provided, nevertheless, that the same laws be consonant to reason, and not repugnant or contrary, but (as near as conveniently may be) agreeable to the laws and statutes and rights of this our kingdom of England...
Page 228 - ... except that of debts or of criminal prosecutions: The term limited for this emigration shall be fixed to the space of eighteen months, to be computed from the day of the exchange of the ratification of the present treaty.
Page 15 - That neither this act, nor any other act, or acts whatsoever, shall preclude, or debar the inhabitants of this province and territories, from claiming, having and enjoying any of the rights, privileges and immunities...
Page 451 - The entrance into the harbor is by a narrow channel, about 1000 feet wide at its entrance, so difficult of access that only one vessel can enter at a time. It is strongly fortified with platforms, works, and artillery, for half a mile, which is the length of the passage ; and the mouth of this channel is secured by two strong castles, one on each side. The place is also protected by other strong fortifications. The city stands on a plain on the west side of the harbor The streets are in general narrow,...
Page 457 - ... be governed in his Britannic Majefty's name, under the fame laws and adminiftration of juftice, and under fuch, conditions as. they have done hitherto...
Page 347 - At the same time a flood of water broke in, and rolled these poor souls over and over, some catching hold of beams and rafters of houses ; others were found in the sand, that appeared when the water was drained away, with their legs and arms out.

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