The Medical Renaissance of the Sixteenth Century

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A. Wear, R. K. French, I. M. Lonie
Cambridge University Press, Mar 7, 1985 - History - 349 pages
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This book examines the relationship of medicine to those intellectual and social changes which historians call the Renaissance. The contributors describe how the whole range of medicine, from practical therapeutics to surgery, anatomy and pharmacy, was developing. Some important questions about the nature of medicine as it was taught and practised are raised. These include the continuing vigour of Arabic and scholastic medicine, how this was reconciled with the renaissance love of all things Greek and the nature of medicine in different parts of Europe. The chapters are written by acknowledged experts in their subjects and are based on contributions read at a meeting called for the purpose in Cambridge and supported by the Wellcome Trust.
 

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Contents

goals
16
Berengario da Carpi and the use of commentary
42
G Baader Institut fur Geschichte der Medizin Augustastrasse 37 1000 Berlin
45
Humanist surgery
75
Pharmacy in the republic of Venice in the sixteenth century
100
Explorations in renaissance writings on the practice
118
Jacques Dubois as a practitioner
146
occult causes and diseases of
175
Fabricius and the Aristotle project in anatomical teaching
195
Disputation and description in the renaissance pulse
223
Academicism versus empiricism in practical medicine
246
Notes
271
Index
343
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