A New Pocket Companion for Oxford: Or, Guide Through the University;: Containing an Accurate Description of the Public Edifices, the Buildings in Each of the Colleges; the Gardens, Statues, Pictures, Hieroglyphics, and All Other Curiosities in the University. With an Historical Account of the Foundation of the Several Colleges and Their Present State. To which are Added, Descriptions of the Buildings, Tapestry, Paintings, Sculptures, Temples, Gardens, &c. at Blenheim and Nuneham, the Seats of His Grace the Duke of Marlborough, and Earl Harcourt..

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J. Cooke, 1814 - Nuneham Courtenay (England) - 162 pages
 

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Page 158 - And wisdom's self Oft seeks to sweet retired solitude, Where, with her best nurse, contemplation, She plumes her feathers, and lets grow her wings, That in the various bustle of resort Were all too ruffled, and sometimes impaired. He that has light within his own clear breast May sit i...
Page 18 - Law, veiled, with the tables of stone, to which she points with her iron rod. On her right hand is the Gospel, with the cross in one hand, and a chalice in the other. In the same division, over the Mosaical Law, is History, holding up her pen as dedicating it to Truth, and an attending Genius, with several fragments of old Writing, from which she collects her history into her books.
Page 143 - ... Bavarians, Near the Village of Blenheim, , On the Banks of the Danube, By JOHN Duke of MARLBOROUGH, The Hero not only of...
Page 161 - ... the Skies. Here too the thoughtless and the young may tread, Who shun the drearier Mansions of the Dead ; May here be taught what worth the world has known. Her Wit, her Sense, her...
Page 137 - TO THE MEMORY OF QUEEN ANNE UNDER WHOSE AUSPICES JOHN DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH CONQUERED AND TO WHOSE MUNIFICENCE HE AND HIS POSTERITY WITH GRATITUDE OWE THE POSSESSION OF BLENHEIM.
Page 18 - Pleasure, for the gre;it lovers and students of those arts : and that this assembly might be perfectly happy, their great enemies and disturbers, Envy, Rapine, and Brutality, are by the Genii of their opposite virtues, viz. Prudence, Fortitude, and Eloquence, driven from the society, and thrown down headlong from the clouds : the report of the assembly of the one, and the expulsion of the other, being proclaimed through the open and serene air by some other of the Genii, who, blowing their antic...
Page 157 - That pleasure was the chiefest good, (And was, perhaps, i' th' right, if rightly understood) His life he to his doctrine brought, And in a garden's shade that sovereign pleasure sought : Whoever a true epicure would be, May there find cheap and virtuous luxury.
Page 43 - Queen Charlotte. It is extremely well illuminated, and has a chimney-piece of beautiful marble ; and there is an opening from the gallery over the...
Page 110 - Oliver, in his eighteenth year, and given by him to the College in the year 1700. In this and other parts of the Church are some monuments, no less remarkable for their elegant inscriptions than their beautiful structure.
Page 20 - Arithmetic in the square on one hand, with a paper of figures ; Optics with the perspective Glass ; Geometry, with a pair of Compasses in her left hand ; and a table, with geometrical figures in it, in her right hand.

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