The orientalist; or, Electioneering in Ireland, by myself [mrs. Purcell].

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Page 283 - The bridegroom may forget the bride Was made his wedded wife yestreen ; The monarch may forget the crown ' That on his head an hour has been ; The mother may forget the child That smiles sae sweetly on her knee ; But I'll remember thee, Glencairn, And a' that thou hast done for me ! " LINES, SENT TO SIR JOHN WHITEFORD, OF WHITEFORD, BART.
Page 26 - tis the mind that makes the body rich ; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers are more beautiful ? Or is the adder better than the eel, Because his painted skin contents the eye...
Page 178 - Safe from the treacherous friend, the daring spark, The glance by day, the whisper in the dark, When kind occasion prompts their warm desires, When music softens, and when dancing fires?
Page 138 - I have great hope in that: for in her youth There is a prone and speechless dialect Such as moves men; beside, she hath prosperous art When she will play with reason and discourse, And well she can persuade.
Page 267 - A heart that knows not to deceive, (Alas ! nor longer free ;) That faithful heart should truly tell The secret charm, the tender spell, That bound it first to thee. Tis not, that cradled in thine eyes The baby Love for ever lies On couches...
Page 109 - twas then I knew Most perfect bliss. — For Love, at other times suppress'd, Was all betray'd at this — I saw him weeping in her eyes, I heard him breathe among her sighs, And every sob which shook her breast Thrill'd mine with bliss. The sight which keen affection clears, How can it judge amiss ? To me it pictured hope, and taught My spirit this consoling thought, That Love's sun, though it rise in tears, May set in bliss.
Page 334 - O God, whose nature and property is ever to have mercy and to forgive, receive our humble petitions ; and though we be tied and bound with the chain of our sins, yet let the pitifulness of thy great mercy loose us ; for the honour of Jesus Christ, our Mediator and Advocate.
Page 247 - If a man would register all his opinions upon love, politics, religion, learning, &c., beginning from his youth, and so go on to old age, what a bundle of inconsistencies and contradictions would appear at last...
Page 57 - In the midst of life we are in death ; of whom may we seek for succour, but of thee, O Lord, who for our sins art justly displeased...
Page 64 - Nothing exceeds in ridicule, no doubt, A fool in fashion, but a fool that's out, His passion for absurdity's so strong, He cannot bear a rival in the wrong ; Though wrong the mode, comply ; more sense is shown In wearing others

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