International Law Studies

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1918 - International law
 

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Page 222 - Unless the Imperial Government should now immediately declare and effect an abandonment of its present methods of submarine warfare against passenger and freight-carrying vessels, the Government of the United States can have no choice but to sever diplomatic relations with the German Empire altogether.
Page 226 - Whenever there is a declared war between the United States and any foreign nation or government, or any invasion or predatory incursion is perpetrated, attempted, or threatened against the territory of the United States by any foreign nation or government, and the President makes public proclamation of the event, all natives, citizens, denizens, or subjects of the hostile nation or government...
Page 226 - States is hereby formally declared; and that the President be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States...
Page 240 - An Act to codify, revise, and amend the penal laws of the United States...
Page 226 - That the state of war between the United States and the Imperial German Government which has thus been thrust upon the United States is hereby formally declared...
Page 229 - An alien enemy whom the President shall have reasonable cause to believe to be aiding or about to aid the enemy...
Page 227 - Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim to all whom it may concern that a state of war exists between the United States and the Imperial German Government...
Page 248 - Islands, which at the time of coming into such jurisdiction was owned in whole or in part by any corporation, citizen, or subject of any nation with which the United States may be at war...
Page 139 - Every merchant vessel which sailed from a port other than a German port after the 1st March, 1915, having on board goods which are of enemy origin or are enemy property may be required to discharge such goods in a British or allied port.
Page 110 - Germany and her allies and Great Britain and her allies; that the zone of war includes the waters adjacent to the British Isles ; that, in accordance with formal notice given by the Imperial German Government, vessels flying the flag of Great Britain or of any of her allies, are liable to destruction in those waters and that travelers sailing in the war zone on ships of Great Britain or her allies do so at their own risk.

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