Bust: How the Courts Have Exposed the Rotten Heart of the Irish Economy

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Penguin Books Limited, 2011 - Business & Economics - 272 pages
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'A litany of shame and disgrace ...... McDonald has put together a compelling account to back up her conclusion that 'the Celtic Tiger was little more than a mirage: a massive pyramid scheme'.' Frank McDonald, Irish Times

'Will make readers' blood boil with its line-up of rogues' Sunday Business Post

'Readers start Bust with astonished laughter that gradually subsides to a sickened terror' Evening Herald

'A racy but edifying read' Phoenix

When, after fifteen years of runaway growth based largely on property speculation, the Irish economy finally crashed, Ireland's bankers and developers tried to keep themselves out of sight. But they couldn't keep themselves out of court - and it is in the courtrooms that the full, sickening drama of the Irish meltdown is being played out.

Dearbhail McDonald, the legal editor of the Irish Independent, has been following the high-stakes rows through the courts and, drawing upon her unmatched contacts, tells the often bizarre stories behind an extraordinary reversal of fortune. From the man who ran a pyramid scheme in a Dublin suburb to the leading developers whose business now lies in ruins, from the man who lost billions on Anglo Irish Bank to the ordinary mortgage-holders who find themselves on the wrong side of the law, Bust paints a gripping picture of the human drama - and the human cost - of an economic catastrophe.

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About the author (2011)

David Dyergrew up in a coastal town in NSW, Australia, and graduated as dux of his high school in 1984. After commencing a degree in medicine and surgery at the University of Sydney, he soon decided it was not for him.

David went on to train as a ship's officer at the Australian Maritime College, travelling Australia and the world in a wide range of merchant ships. He graduated from the college with distinction and was awarded a number of prizes, including the Company of Master Mariners Award for highest overall achievement in the course. He then returned to the University of Sydney to complete a combined degree in Arts and Law. David was awarded the Frank Albert Prize for first place in Music I, High Distinctions in all English courses and First Class Honours in Law. From the mid-1990s until early 2000s David worked as a litigation lawyer in Sydney, and then in London at a legal practice whose parent firm represented the Titanic's owners back in 1912. In 2002 David returned to Australia and obtained a Diploma in Education from the University of New England, and commenced teaching English at Kambala, a school for girls in Sydney's eastern suburbs.

David has had a life-long obsession with the Titanic and has become an expert on the subject. In 2009 he was awarded a Commonwealth Government scholarship to write The Midni

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