The Court and Camp of Buonaparte

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John Murray, 1829 - France - 326 pages
 

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Page 189 - As the government was now effectually converted into a military usurpation, it became easy to simplify its operations ; and most of the persons formerly employed in civil departments were dismissed from office. Some were at once turned off; others had documents given them, entitling them to be reinstated upon vacancies ; a few had some trifling pension promised. All who had depended for employment and subsistence upon foreign trade were now destitute.
Page 320 - ... that was how to deal with the Spaniards. He then sent soldiers to every house, with orders to the inhabitants immediately to receive and accommodate the wounded of the two nations, who were lodged together, one English and one Frenchman ; and he expressly directed that the Englishmen should always be served first.
Page 295 - A council of war, composed of French marshals, was appointed to try him ; but they had little inclination to pass sentence on an old companion in arms; and declared their incompetency to try one, who, when he consummated his treason, was a peer of France. Accordingly, by a royal ordinance of November 12th, the Chamber of Peers were directed to take cognizance of the affair. His defence was made to rest by his advocates — first, on the twelfth article of the capitulation, and when this was over-ruled,...
Page 264 - ... as he advanced towards the Cossacks, who were under the walls of the city, produced a loud peal of applause from those wild warriors. As an armistice had been agreed on during the evacuation of the city by the Russian rear, he remained for two hours in the midst of his new admirers, who called him their " hetman," and pressed round him with tumultuous enthusiasm. His vanity was so much gratified with the homage of these children of the wilderness, that he distributed among them, first, all the...
Page 320 - After complimenting the latter, and observing that they understood the laws and courtesies of war, he told them there was one thing which they did not understand, and that was how to deal with the Spaniards. He then...
Page 287 - Ney's kindness stop there ; for when the flag of truce arrived, and he became acquainted with the situation of Major Napier's family, he suddenly waived all forms, and instead of answering the inquiry by a cold intimation of the captive's existence, sent him, and with him the few English prisoners taken in the battle, at once to England, merely demanding that none should serve until regularly exchanged. I should not have dwelt thus long upon the private adventures of an officer, but that gratitude...
Page 296 - He was called from his bed and a tranquil sleep to hear his sentence read. As the preamble went on enumerating his many titles he hastily broke in — 'why cannot you simply call me Michael Ney, — now a French soldier and soon a heap of dust?' The last interview with his wife and children shook his stern heart more than all the battles he had passed through, or his approaching death. This over he resumed his wonted calmness. In reply to one of his sentinels, who said, 'Marshal, you should now think...
Page 186 - He was immediately made a sergeant ; not long afterwards he obtained a commission ; and in 1796 was nominated aide-de-camp to his benefactor. In the campaign of Italy Junot exhibited daring courage, and it is said, great rapacity. In Egypt he served with distinction as general of brigade, and soon after his return was placed over a division. Into the Legion of Honour he entered as a matter of course ; but to the particular favour of Napoleon he owed the governorship of Paris, and the embassy to Lisbon,...
Page 34 - Evreux, or the prefect's courier ; but I am well aware that your first attentions are due to the members of the Corps Diplomatique, to your family, and above all to the happy princess who has just realized your dearest hopes. She cannot be more tenderly devoted to you than I am ; but she has had it in her power to do more for your happiness by assuring the welfare of France : she has, therefore, a right to your first sentiments, to all your cares ; and I, who was your companion in misfortune only,...
Page 287 - Corunna, but he recommended Major Napier to the attention of Marshal Ney ; and that marshal also treated his prisoner with the kindness of a friend rather than the rigour of an enemy, for he quartered him with the French consul, supplied him with money, gave him a general invitation to his house on all public occasions, and refrained from sending him to France.

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