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it calls in the quack ; but the moment told “ Eyre once demanded of that sees quiet succeed to disturbance, Wilkes, why he abused him so unand the nation has recovered its com- mercifully in his speeches to the posure, always sees the Whigs driven Livery while he was Recorder, though out of office. The death of Fox, in in private he expressed a regard for 1806, unquestionably deprived the him?”—“ So I have,” said Wilkes, party of a great popular name, but "and it is for that reason I abuse you the whole strength of Whiggism sur- in public. I wish to have you provived. It was in full possession of moted to a judgeship." power, and the late dissolution had " When Sir Robert Henley was filled Parliament with its adherents; keeper of the Great Seal, and presided still its old fate prevailed. Like ships in the House, he was often indignant floating over the land only by the at seeing his decrees reversed, while, help of an inundation, when the waters not being a peer, he was not entitled return to their channel the ships re- to support his decisions. In the famain, only to be broken in pieces, mous case of Drury and Drury, his the Whig government was broken decision having been reversed, though up never to be restored, until a new the bar then and still pronounced it convulsion in France, producing a valid, the lord keeper was very angry; corresponding convulsion in England, and, in driving home, his coachman brought them into office, after a lapse checked the horses. He asked—Why of another quarter of a century. he did not drive on?' The man say

In March 1807, a bill having been ing— My lord, I can't. If I do, I prepared as a preliminary to the shall kill an old woman.

- Drive on,' Popish concession, the king pronounced cried Henley; if you do kill her, she it contrary to his coronation oath, and has nothing to do but to appeal to the insisted on its withdrawal; the Whigs House of Lords.' He was afterwards consented; but the king further in- made lord chancellor, and this habit sisting on a pledge that they would of reversals came to an end." attempt no similar measure, they de- On his quitting the chancellorship, murred, and his majesty instantly dis- and accepting the inferior office of missed them, amidst the general re- lord president, the Archbishop of joicing of the empire. The Duke of Canterbury congratulating him Portland was placed at the head of a his removal from an office of unceasnew ministry, and Lord Eldon re- ing fatigue to one of so much quiet, ceived the Seals.

the ex-chancellor not being at all We have now seen his lordship satisfied with the difference of the secure in that station which he was emoluments, answered very sulkily, to retain until the close of his useful “I suppose, now, you would think I and vigorous life; we shall, therefore, was extremely civil and kind if I were abandon politics, and turn to his more to congratulate your grace on a trannumerous recollections of incident and sition from Canterbury to Llandaff.” character.

Taylor, an extravagant personage Lord Eldon as a warrior.

who called himself a chevalier, and ring the war," says his lordship, “I who professed extraordinary skill in became one of the Lincoln's Inn vo- the diseases of the eye, dining one lunteers—Lord Ellenborough, at the day with the bar on the Oxford cirsame time, being one of the corps. It cuit, related many wonders which he happened, unfortunately for the mili- had done. Bearcroft, a little out of hutary character of both of us, that we mour at his self-conceit, said—“Pray, were turned out of the awkward squad Chevalier, as you have told us a great for awkwardness! I think Ellen- many things which you have done, borough was more awkward than I try to tell us something which you was; but others thought that it was cannot do."

“ Nothing so easy," difficult to determine which was the said Taylor ; “I cannot pay my share

His brother William, how- of the dinner-bill; and that, sir, I ever, was a smart officer, and com- must beg of you to do.” manded a corps.

Lord Thurlow's oddity and abruptOf Chief-Justice Eyre, whom he ness, both sometimes amounting to succeeded in the Common Pleas, he brutality, were the constant source of

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amusement-at least to all but the sure on his conduct, was negatived sufferers. On a trial in which an without a division. The Duke of attorney gave evidence respecting the York was, beyond all question, clear will of a man whose death was in of any knowledge of the practices of question, the attorney, after some the very ingenious person with whom puzzling, said—“My lord, hear me, he associated, but few men have ever the man is dead; I attended his fune- paid more dearly for their offence. ral ; he was my client.Why, The storm of public abuse which sir, said Thurlow, "did you not poured on him for months, must have mention that at first ? a great deal of been torture; and his resignation of time and trouble might have been office must have stung every feeling; saved. That he was your client is and even his pecuniary sacrifice dusome evidence that he was dead; ring the three years of his retirement, nothing was so likely to kill him." must have been severely felt by a

At Buxton, Thurlow lodged with a prince with a narrow income for his surgeon, opposite to a butcher's shop. rank. That loss could not have been He asked his landlord whether he or less than £50,000. In 1811 he rehis neighbour killed the most.

sumed the command. We must hasten Thurlow, on being asked, how he got to the conclusion. Lord Eldon, after through all his business as a chancel- witnessing the two great changes of lor, answered—“ Just as a pickpocket the constitution, the Popish bill of gets through a horse-pond. He must 1829—which he calls the “ fatal bill," get through.” Dunning, when a simi- and which he had resisted with all his lar question was put to him, answer- vigour and learning for a long succesed in much the same spirit, though in sion of years—and the Reform bill of a more professional style. “I divide 1832, at length found that period my business into three parts: one coming to him which comes to all. part I do; another does itself; and Retiring from public life, he devoted the third I leave undone."

himself to his study, the society of a In 1807, Lord Eldon purchased few old friends, and those considerathe estate of Encombe in the Isle of tions of a higher kind which he had Purbeck, for which he paid between cultivated from early life, and which £52,000 and £53,000, comprising a returned to him, as they return to all mansion with 2000 acres, a fertile who reverence them, with additional valley, with a fine sea view.

force when their presence was more In 1809, the charges brought by consolatory and essential. But old Colonel Wardle against the Duke of age naturally strips us of those who York excited great public interest. gave an especial value to life; and The very sound of malversation in after seeing his brother Lord Stowell, high employments excites all the and Lady Eldon—his Elizabeth, for feelings of a nation with whom cha- whom he seems to have always reracter is the first requisite; and the tained the tenderness of their early rumour that the Duke had been a years—taken from him, he quietly party to the sale of commissions in sank into the grave, dying in 1838, the army by Mrs Clarke, with whom January 13th, aged 87. He deserved he had formed an unfortunate con- to rest in peace—for he had lived in nexion, produced a public uproar. patriotism, integrity, and honour. After discussions and examination of The three volumes exhibit a rewitnesses, which lasted six weeks, and search which does much credit to the brought infinite obloquy on the Duke intelligence and industry of Mr Twiss, and his defenders, the House of Com- their author. They abound in capital mons resolved, by 278 to 196, that anecdotes, but a few of which we have the charge of corruption, or even of been able to give-possess passages of connivance, against the Duke, was very effective writing—and form a wholly without foundation. Upon work which ought to be in the library this clearance of his character, the of every lawyer, statesman, and EngDuke resigned the command of the lish gentleman. army; a subsequent motion for a cen

Edinburgh : Printed by Ballantyne and Hughes, Paul's Work,

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CCCXLVII.

SEPTEMBER, 1844.

VOL. LVI.

CONTENTS.

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M. LOUIS BLANC,
A NIGHT ON THE BANKS OF THE TENNESSEE,
THE EXECUTION OF MONTROSE,
THE WITCHFINDER. PART I.,
NATURAL HISTORY OF MAN,
POEMS BY COVENTRY PATMORE,
MARSTON; OR, THE MEMOIRS OF A STATESMAN. PART XIII.,
It is No FICTION,
THE BURNS' FESTIVAL,
STANZAS FOR THE BURNS' FESTIVAL. BY DELTA,

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EDINBURGH:
WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS, 45, GEORGE STREET;

AND 22, PALL-MALL, LONDON.
To whom all Communications (post paid) must be addressed.
SOLD BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.

PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND HUGHES, EDINBURGH.

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M. Louis Blanc, & democratic ample gratification. To be sure they journalist, with all, and perhaps more will be occasionally required, in lieu than the usual talents of the Parisian of such as they have thrown down, to journalist, with all, and more than set up the bust of some democratic the usual faults of one-has undertaken celebrity, whose greatness, or whose to write the history of his country, genius, they were not previously aware during and since the revolution of of. But, not to say that the justice of 1830. What can we expect to be the party requires this substitution, it is result of such an undertaking? What à penalty which writers of this decan we expect from a man who sits scription will invariably impose upon down to a task of this description, them. It is the common trick of the animated with all the party virulence envious, and the mock magnanimity which gives zest to a democratic with which they seek to conceal their newspaper? It is not a history, but a true nature—to exalt the lowly, while scandal, that he will write. M. Louis they debase the exalted. Since some Blanc has distilled the bile of journal- idol there must be, let it be one of ism ; he has paused over the hasty their raising. Even while helping to sarcasm which political animosity raise it, they enjoy, too, the secret deals forth, not to correct, or mode- consciousness that it is of brittle rate, or abate, but merely to point metal. and envenom it. His appreciation of But in the composition of a history, men, their character, their talents, the spirit of party, however eager it their designs—all bear the hue of the may be, cannot always guide the pen. atrabilious journalist. There is this The mere interest of the narrative, difference only between his history the strangeness and peculiarity of cirand the daily portion of envy and cumstances, will claim their share of malignity which a democratic news- the author's mind. The politician paper pours forth, that the dye is more must sometimes be absorbed in the deeply engrained. In the mind of the chronicler; and so it happens with author, the stain of his party has be- M. Louis Blanc. His narrative often come ineffaceable. Those who are interests by its details ; and if it has pleased—and the number is not few- the partiality, it has also the vivacious with having high names and esta- colouring, of a contemporary. It posblished reputations laid at their feet, sesses, also, a richness of anecdotesoiled, trod upon, will meet here with the fruit, probably, of his position as

Histoire de Dix Ans, 1830_-1840. Par M. Louis Blanc. VOL. LVI. NO. CCCXLVII.

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