The diary of an invalid, the journal of a tour in Portugal, Italy, Switzerland and France, Volume 1

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Page 23 - How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds Makes ill deeds done...
Page 106 - Let him study the Holy Scriptures, especially the New Testament. Therein are contained the words of eternal life. It has God for its Author ; salvation for its end ; and truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter.
Page 243 - Not where he eats, but where he is eaten : a certain convocation of politic worms are e'en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet : we fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots...
Page 39 - For it so falls out, That what we have we prize not to the worth, Whiles we enjoy it; but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack the value; then we find The virtue, that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours...
Page 102 - You should not have believed me. For virtue cannot so inoculate our old stock but we shall relish of it.
Page 229 - ... ritu florent modo nata vigentque. debemur morti nos nostraque: sive receptus terra Neptunus classes Aquilonibus arcet, regis opus...
Page 209 - My father's spirit in arms ! all is not well; I doubt some foul play: 'would, the night were come! Till then sit still, my soul: Foul deeds will rise, Though all the earth o'erwhelm them, to men's eyes.
Page 9 - It is a strange thing that in sea voyages, where there is nothing to be seen but sky and sea, men should make diaries ; but in land travel, wherein so much is to be observed, for the most part they omit it, as if chance were fitter to be registered than observation.
Page 243 - As he came forth of his mother's womb, naked shall he return to go as he came, and shall take nothing of his labour, which he may carry away in his hand.
Page 42 - The foundation-ground gave way during the progress of the building, and the architect completed his work in the direction thus accidentally given to it. Accordingly, we find in the construction of the upper part, that the weight is disposed in a way to support the equilibrium. Upon the whole, it is a very elegant structure; and the general effect is so pleasing, that, like Alexander's wry neck, it might well bring leaning into fashion amongst all the towers in Christendom.

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