Illustrations of the scenery of Killarney and the surrounding country

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J. Carpenter, 1807 - 223 pages
 

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Contents

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Page 40 - Admit it partially, and half exclude, And half reveal its graces : in this path How long soe'er the wanderer roves, each step Shall wake fresh beauties ; each short point present A different picture, new, and yet the same.
Page 36 - His gardens next your admiration call, On every side you look, behold the wall! No pleasing intricacies intervene, No artful wildness to perplex the scene: Grove nods at grove, each alley has a brother, And half the platform just reflects the other.
Page 141 - Wisdom's self Oft seeks to sweet retired solitude ; Where, with her best nurse, Contemplation, She plumes her feathers, and lets grow her wings, That in the various bustle of resort Were all too ruffled, and sometimes impair'd. He that has light within his own clear breast, May sit i...
Page 103 - Moisten'd their fiery beams, with which she thrill'd Frail hearts, yet quenched not ; like starry light, Which, sparkling on the silent waves, does seem more bright.
Page 116 - To th' instruments divine respondence meet ; The silver sounding instruments did meet With the base murmure of the waters fall ; The waters fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call ; The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
Page 3 - Shade, unperceived, so softening into shade ; And all so forming an harmonious whole, That, as they still succeed, they ravish still.
Page 94 - Anno 1180; this abbey of Innisf alien being ever esteemed a paradise and a secure sanctuary, the treasure and the most valuable effects of the whole country were deposited in the hands of the clergy; notwithstanding which, we find the abbey was plundered in this year by Maolduin, son of Daniel O'Donoghue. Many of the clergy were slain, and even in their cemetery, by the Macarthys. But God soon punished this act of impiety and sacrilege, by bringing many of its authors to an untimely end.
Page 131 - Kilda's * shore, whose lonely race Resign the setting sun to Indian worlds, The royal eagle draws his vigorous young, Strong-pounced, and ardent with paternal fire. Now fit to raise a kingdom of their own, He drives them from his fort, the towering seat, For ages, of his empire ; which, in peace, Unstain'd he holds, while many a league to sea He wings his course, and preys in distant isles.
Page 44 - ... idea of it by describing it as displaying the mountains in a transparent state, and suffused with a lively purple hue. Varying however from the aerial aspect of distant mountains, all the objects upon them, rocks, woods, and even houses, are distinctly visible, — more so, indeed, than at noon day ; whilst at the same time their forms appear so unsubstantial, so ethereal, that one might almost fancy it possible to pass through them without resistance. I happened to be alone when I first witnessed...
Page 73 - When we had received our boats, each of which was capable of containing one hundred and twenty men, I ordered one of them to be rowed about the water, in order to find out the most convenient place for landing upon the enemy ; which they perceiving thought fit, by a timely submission, to prevent the danger that threatened them ; and having expressed their desires to that purpose, commissioners were appointed on both sides to treat.

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