A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy, Volume 1

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T. Becket and P.A. De Hondt, 1770 - France
 

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Page 124 - He then took his crust of bread out of his wallet again, as if to eat it; held it some time in his hand — then laid it upon the bit of his ass's bridle — looked wistfully at the little arrangement he had made — and then gave a sigh.
Page 84 - What a large volume of adventures may be grasped within this little span of life, by him who interests his heart in every thing, and who, having eyes to see what time and chance are perpetually holding out to him as he journeyeth on his way, misses nothing he can fairly lay his hands on.
Page 123 - AND this, said he, putting the remains of a crust into his wallet, and this should have been thy portion, said he, hadst thou been alive to have shared it with me.
Page 85 - I pity the man who can travel from Dan. to Beersheba, and cry, 'Tis all barren and so it is; and so is all the world to him, who will not cultivate the fruits it offers.
Page 11 - Truth might lie between He was certainly sixtyfive; and the general air of his countenance, notwithstanding something seem'd to have been planting wrinkles in it before their time, agreed to the account. It was one of those heads...
Page 86 - The learned SMELFUNGUS travelled from Boulogne to Paris from Paris to Rome and so on but he set out with the spleen and jaundice, and every object he pass'd by was discoloured or distorted He wrote an account of them, but 'twas nothing but the account of his miserable feelings.
Page 126 - He said, Heaven had accepted the conditions, and that he had set out from his cottage with this poor creature, who had been a patient partner of his journey that it had eat the same bread with him all the way, and was unto him as a friend.
Page 161 - HAIL ye small sweet courtesies of life, for smooth do ye make the road of it! like grace and beauty which beget inclinations to love at first sight : 'tis ye who open this door and let the stranger in.
Page 11 - ... wrinkles in it before their time, agreed to the account. It was one of those heads which Guido has often painted mild, pale penetrating, free from all commonplace ideas of fat contented ignorance looking downwards upon the earth it look'd forwards ; but look'd, as if it look'd at something beyond this world.
Page 16 - I, laying my hand upon the sleeve of his tunic, in return for his appeal we distinguish, my good father! betwixt those who wish only to eat the bread of their own labour and those who eat the bread of other people's, and have no other plan in life, but to get through it in sloth and ignorance, for the love of God.

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