Social Life at the English Universities in the Eighteenth Century

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Deighton, Bell, and Company, 1874 - Cambridge (England) - 727 pages
 

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Page 606 - Medleys are jumbled together with the Flying Post ; the Examiner is deadly sick ; the Spectator keeps up, and doubles its price ; I know not how long it will hold. Have you seen the red stamp the papers are marked with ? Methinks it is worth a halfpenny, the stamping it.
Page 687 - Hobson kept a stable of forty good cattle, always ready and fit for travelling ; but when a man came for a horse, he was led into the stable, where there was great choice, but he obliged him to take the horse which stood next to the stable door ; so that every customer was alike well served according to his chance ; and every horse ridden with the same justice ; from whence it became a proverb when what ought to be your election was forced upon you, to say, Hobson's choice.
Page 195 - ... our house was in a manner invested, and entrance demanded by twelve o'clock at noon ; and before one it was not wide enough for many who came too late for places.
Page 6 - The King, observing with judicious eyes, The state of both his universities, To Oxford sent a troop of horse ; and why ? That learned body wanted loyalty : To Cambridge books he sent, as well discerning How much that loyal body wanted learning.
Page 6 - The King to Oxford sent a troop of horse, For Tories own no argument but force ; With equal skill to Cambridge books he sent, For Whigs admit no force but argument.
Page 631 - Hardwicke) concerning the right of appeal from the vice-chancellor of Cambridge to the senate ; supported by a short historical account of the jurisdiction of the university ; in answer to a late pamphlet, intituled 'An Inquiry into the right of appeal from the vice-chancellor, &c.' By a fellow of a college,
Page 687 - I shall conclude this discourse with an explanation of a proverb, which by vulgar error is taken and used when a man is reduced to an extremity, whereas the propriety of the maxim is to use it whSn you would say there is plenty, but you must make such a choice as not to hurt another who is to come after you.
Page 468 - ... cloaks, without guards, welts, long buttons, or cuts. And no ecclesiastical person shall wear any coif or wrought high-cap, but only plain night-caps of black silk, satin, or velvet. In all which particulars concerning the apparel here prescribed, our meaning is not to attribute any holiness or special worthiness to the said garments, but for decency, gravity, and order, as is before specified.
Page 432 - ... and the juice of sloes. In an action at law, laid against a carman for having staved a cask of port, it appeared, from the evidence of the cooper, that there were not above five gallons of real wine in the whole pipe, which held above...
Page 687 - ... the stable door ; so that every customer was alike well served according to his chance, and every horse ridden with the same justice ; from whence it became a proverb, when what ought to be your election was forced upon you, to say,

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