A Reply to the Letter of J. Fenimore Cooper

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J. T. Buckingham, 1834 - United States - 76 pages

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Page 30 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished"?
Page 30 - The one loved to descant on liberty and the rights of mankind, the other on the mischiefs of sedition and the rights of kings. Though both, as I have said, admitted a common principle, the maintenance of the constitution, yet this made the privileges of the subject, that the crown's prerogative his peculiar care. Hence it seemed likely that, through passion and circumstance, the tory might aid in establishing despotism, or the whig in subverting monarchy. The former was generally hostile to the liberty...
Page 59 - In strict accordance with this principle, the power of removal, which, like that of appointment, is an original executive power, is left unchecked by the Constitution in relation to all executive officers, for whose conduct the President is responsible, while it is taken from him in relation to judicial officers, for whose acts he is not responsible.
Page 72 - ... in the utmost harmony with ministers, whom the people regard with the utmost abhorrence ; who vote thanks, when the public opinion calls upon them for impeachments; who are eager to grant, when the general voice demands...
Page 30 - Within those bounds which he, as well as his antagonist, meant not to transgress, and rejecting all unnecessary innovation, the whig had a natural tendency to political improvement, the tory an aversion to it. The one loved to descant on liberty and the rights of mankind, the other on the mischiefs of sedition and the rights of kings.
Page 63 - ... imperio, il quale reggendosi sotto quel nome, non permetteva che gli scrittori parlassono liberamente di lui. Ma chi vuole conoscere quello che gli scrittori liberi ne direbbono, vegga quello che dicono di Catilina.
Page 73 - the waves of the sea do not more certainly waste the shore, than the minds of ambitious men are led to invade the liberties of their brethren.
Page 6 - O of an internal origin, it will not be by executive, but by legislative usurpation. The former is easily enough restrained ; while the latter, cloaked under the appearance of legality and representation, is but too apt to carry the public sentiment with it. England has changed its form of government, from that of a monarchy to that of an exceedingly oppressive aristocracy, precisely in this manner.
Page 61 - ... the sake of Hanover; and exhibited the present government as in its conduct totally opposite to the principles and stipulations of the act of settlement. To the whigs it appealed, upon their own genuine and original doctrines and sentiments. The present administration had, by unexampled corruption, established an influence more despotical, than the power which the most tyrannical of the Stuarts ever sought.
Page 28 - If this Union shall ever be destroyed by any error or faults of an internal origin, it will not be by executive, but by legislative usurpation. . . . England has changed its form of government, from that of a monarchy to that of an exceedingly oppressive aristocracy, precisely in this manner.

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