Indian Wars of New England: Topography of Indian tribes. The early settler and the Indian. The Pequod war. Wars of the Mohegans

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Page 121 - In his person he is a very lusty man, in his best years, an able body grave of countenance, and spare of speech; in his attire little or nothing differing from the rest of his followers, only in a great chain of white bone beads about his neck; and at it, behind his neck, hangs a little bag of tobacco, which he drank,* and gave us to drink. His face was painted with a sad red, like murrey, and oiled both head and face, that he looked greasily.
Page 382 - Indians, such as he desired, but would not speak of any business at any time, before some of his counsellors were present...
Page 389 - These things being duly weighed and considered, the commissioners apparently see that Vncus cannot be safe while Myantenomo lives; but that, either by secret treachery or open force, his life will be still in danger. Wherefore they think he may justly put such a false and bloodthirsty enemy to death; but in his own jurisdiction, not in the English plantations. And advising that, in the manner of his death, all mercy and moderation be showed, contrary to the practice of the Indians who exercise tortures...
Page 347 - They returned with acceptance and good success of their business; observing in the sachem much state, great command of his men, and marvellous wisdom in his answers; and in the carriage of the whole treaty, clearing himself and his neighbors of the murder, and offering revenge of it, yet upon very safe and wary conditions.
Page 148 - ... this was indeed a special obstacle: for without that (they all agreed) it would be dangerous, for any man to attempt the execution of it, lest mischief should befall them every man. He was a person that, in his wrath, did seem to be a second Sampson, able to beat out their...
Page 409 - taking into serious consideration, they say, what was safest and best to be done, were all of opinion that it would not be safe to set him at liberty, neither had we sufficient ground for us to put him to death.
Page 293 - I have given a coate to cloathe her. It is my desire to have her for a servant, if it may stand with your good liking, else not. There is a little squaw that steward Culacut desireth, to whom he hath given a coate.
Page 372 - I desire to see it done before I die, and I am so deep in years, that I cannot expect to live long; besides, we have but one man, viz., the Indian Printer, that is able to compose the Sheets, and correct the Press with understanding.
Page 119 - ... 4. If any did unjustly war against him, we would aid him; if any did war against us, he should aid us.
Page 374 - I have not been dry, night or day, from the third day of the week unto the sixth ; but so travelled, and at night pull off my boots, wring my stockings, and on with them again, and so continue. But God steps in and helps.

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