Outlines of Criminal Law: Based on Lectures Delivered in the University of Cambridge

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University Press, 1907 - Criminal law - 536 pages

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Page 54 - ... to establish a defence on the ground of insanity, it must be clearly proved that, at the time of the committing of the act, the party accused was labouring under such a defect of reason, from disease of the mind, as not to know the nature and quality of the act he was doing, or, if he did know it, that he did not know he was doing what was wrong.
Page 54 - If the accused was conscious that the act was one which he ought not to do, and if that act was at the same time contrary to the law of the land, he is punishable...
Page 54 - ... must be considered in the same situation as to responsibility as if the facts with respect to which the delusion exists were real.
Page 3 - A crime, or misdemeanor, is an act committed, or omitted, in violation of a public law, either forbidding or commanding it.
Page 229 - Geo. 4, c. 29, s. 47, which enacts, that " if any clerk or servant, or any person employed for the purpose or in the capacity of a clerk or servant, shall, by virtue of such employment, receive or take into his possession any chattel, money, or valuable security for or in the name or on the account of his master...
Page 99 - ... between Our Sovereign Lord the King and the prisoner at the bar, and would a true verdict give according to the evidence, so help him God!
Page 433 - ... they become satisfied by the evidence that it is expedient to deal with the case summarily, shall cause the charge to be reduced into writing and read to the...
Page 272 - Thus a compassing of the death of the King was held to be sufficiently evidenced by the overt act of imprisoning him ; because, as Machiavelli had observed, ' between the prisons and the graves of princes the distance is very small.
Page 378 - Comparison of a disputed writing with any writing proved to the satisfaction of the Judge to be genuine shall be permitted to be made by witnesses; and such writings, and the evidence of witnesses respecting the same, may be submitted to the Court and jury as evidence of the genuineness, or otherwise, of the writing in dispute.
Page 4 - The violation of a right when considered in reference to the evil tendency of such violation, as regards the community at large.

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