The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: The Rambler

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Talboys and Wheeler, 1825

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Contents

The dangers and miseries of a literary eminence
78
The unhappiness of marriage caused by irregular motives of choice
87
The danger of ranging from one study to another The importance
93
The folly and inconvenience of affectation
99
An allegory on wit and learning
109
The necessity of attending to the duties of common life The
117
NUMB PAGE 26 The mischief of extravagance and misery of dependence
127
An authors treatment from six patrons
132
The various arts of selfdelusion
136
The folly of anticipating misfortunes
142
The observance of Sunday recommended an allegory
146
The defence of a known mistake highly culpable
150
The vanity of stoicism The necessity of patience
156
An allegorical history of Rest and Labour
161
The uneasiness and disgust of female cowardice
165
A marriage of prudence without affection
171
The reasons why pastorals delight
176
The true principles of pastoral poetry
180
38 The advantages of mediocrity an eastern fable
185
The pping of women whether single or married
190
The difficulty of giving advice without offending
194
The advantages of memory
199
The misery of a modish lady in solitude
204
The inconveniencies of precipitation and confidence
208
Religion and Superstition a vision
213
The causes of disagreement in marriage
218
The mischiefs of rural faction
222
The proper means of regulating sorrow
227
The miseries of an infirm constitution
231
A disquisition upon the value of fame
235
A virtuous old age always reverenced
240
The employments of a housewife in the country
244
The contemplation of the calamities of others a remedy for grief
250
The folly and misery of a spendthrift
254
A deathbed the true school of wisdom The effects of death upon the survivors
258
The gay widows impatience of the growth of her daughter The his tory of miss Maypole
263
The necessity of complaisance The Ramblers grief for offending his correspondents
268
Sententious rules of frugality
273
The desire of wealth moderated by philosophy
277
The garden of Hope a dream
317
Every man chiefly happy or miserable at home The opinion of ser vants not to be despised
322
The miseries and prejudice of old age
326
abandoned
330
No man believes that his own life will be short
334
The necessity of good humour
338
The lingering expectation of an heir
342
Peevishness equally wretched and offensive The character of Tetrica
347
The world never known but by a change of fortune The history of Melissa
352
The arts by which bad men are reconciled to themselves
357
The learned seldom despised but when they deserve contempt
361
The power of novelty Mortality too familiar to raise apprehensions
366
A suspicious man justly suspected
370
a winter scene
375
Lot The great rule of action Debts of justice to be distinguished from debts of charity
381
The virtuosos account of his rarities
383
The virtuosos curiosity justified ?
388
84 A young ladys impatience of control
393
10 02
398
an introduction to a criti cism on Miltons versification
402
The reasons why advice is generally ineffectual
408
A criticism on Miltons versification Elisions dangerous in English poetry
412
The luxury of vain imagination
417
The pauses in English poetry adjusted
421
The conduct of Patronage an allegory
426
The accommodation of sound to the sense often chimerical
431
The prejudices and caprices of criticism
438
An inquiry how far Milton has accommodated the sound to the sense
442
The history of Pertinax the skeptick
449
Truth Falsehood and Fiction an allegory
453
Advice to unmarried ladies
458
The necessity of cultivating politeness
464
The pleasures of private friendship The necessity of similar disposi tions
468
Modish pleasures
472
A proper audience necessary to a wit
476
The voyage of life
484
The prevalence of curiosity The character of Nugaculus
486
The original of flattery The meanness of venal praise
491
a dream
495

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Page 405 - Here love his golden shafts employs, here lights His constant lamp, and waves his purple wings, Reigns here and revels...
Page 39 - Evil into the mind of God or man May come and go, so unapproved, and leave No spot or blame behind...
Page 437 - Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows ; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar.
Page 406 - But thou hast promised from us two a race To fill the earth, who shall with us extol Thy goodness infinite, both when we wake. And when we seek, as now, thy gift of sleep.
Page 414 - Behind him cast ; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the moon, whose orb Through optic glass the Tuscan artist views, At evening, from the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, in her spotty globe.
Page 423 - Whatever hypocrites austerely talk Of purity, and place, and innocence, Defaming as impure what God declares Pure, and commands to some, leaves free to all.
Page 424 - Adam, well may we labour still to dress This garden, still to tend plant, herb, and flower, Our pleasant task enjoin'd ; but, till more hands Aid us, the work under our labour grows, Luxurious by restraint ; what we by day Lop overgrown, or prune, or prop, or bind, One night or two with wanton growth derides, Tending to wild.
Page 425 - Olympian hill I soar, Above the flight of Pegasean wing ! The meaning, not the name, I call ; for thou Nor of the Muses nine, nor on the top Of old Olympus dwell'st ; but...
Page 323 - To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to which every enterprise and labour tends, and of which every desire prompts the prosecution. It is, indeed, at home that every man must be known by those who would make a just estimate either of his virtue or felicity ; for smiles and embroidery are alike occasional, and the mind is often dressed for show in painted honour and fictitious benevolence.
Page 380 - Whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, even so do unto them ; for this is the law and the prophets.

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