The Iliad, tr. by Pope

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Page 111 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground ; Another race the following spring supplies ; They fall successive, and successive rise : So generations in their course decay; So flourish these when those are pass'd away.
Page 158 - O'er the dark trees a yellower verdure shed, And tip with silver every mountain's head ; Then shine the vales, the rocks in prospect rise, A flood of glory bursts from all the skies ; ' The conscious swains, rejoicing in the sight, Eye the blue vault, and bless the useful light.
Page 120 - Yet come it will, the day decreed by fates! (How my heart trembles while my tongue relates!) The day when thou, imperial Troy! must bend, And see thy warriors fall, thy glories end.
Page 122 - ... earth; And such the hard condition of our birth, No force can then resist, no flight can save ; All sink alike, the fearful and the brave. No more — but hasten to thy tasks at home ; There guide the spindle, and direct the loom. Me glory summons to the martial scene, The field of combat is the sphere for men; Where heroes war, the foremost place I claim, The first in danger, as the first in fame.
Page 121 - Thus having spoke, the illustrious chief "of Troy Stretch'd his fond arms to clasp the lovely boy. The babe clung crying to his nurse's breast, Scared at the dazzling helm, and nodding crest. With secret pleasure each fond parent smiled, And Hector hasted to relieve his child, The glittering terrors from his brows unbound, And placed the beaming helmet on the ground ; Then...
Page 18 - He spoke, and awful bends his sable brows, Shakes his ambrosial curls, and gives the nod, The stamp of fate and sanction of the god : High heaven with trembling the dread signal took, And all Olympus to the centre shook.
Page 2 - For Chryses sought with costly gifts to gain His captive daughter from the victor's chain. Suppliant the venerable father stands, Apollo's awful ensigns grace his hands: By these he begs; and, lowly bending down, Extends the sceptre and the laurel crown. 20 He sued to all, but chief implored for grace The brother-kings of Atreus
Page 120 - Yet, while my Hector still survives, I see My father, mother, brethren, all in thee : Alas ! my parents, brothers, kindred, all Once more will perish, if my Hector fall. Thy wife, thy infant, in thy danger share : Oh ! prove a husband's and a father's care! That quarter most the skilful Greeks annoy, Where yon wild fig-trees join the wall of Troy : Thou from this tower defend th...
Page 121 - Priam's hoary hairs defiled with gore, Not all my brothers gasping on the shore ; As thine, Andromache ! thy griefs I dread ; I see thee trembling, weeping, captive led...
Page 2 - Achilles' wrath, to Greece the direful spring Of woes unnumber'd, heavenly goddess sing ! That wrath which hurl'd to Pluto's gloomy reign The souls of mighty chiefs untimely slain ; Whose limbs unburied on the naked shore, Devouring dogs and hungry vultures tore ; Since great Achilles and Atrides strove, Such was the sovereign doom, and such the will of Jove ! Declare, O Muse ! in what ill-fated hour Sprung the fierce strife, from what offended power.

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