Women and Work in Britain Since 1840

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis, 2005 - History - 308 pages

The first book of its kind to study this period, Gerry Holloway's essential student resource works chronologically from the early 1840s to the end of the twentieth century and examines over 150 years of women┐s employment history.

With suggestions for research topics, an annotated bibliography to aid further research, and a chronology of important events which places the subject in a broader historical context, Gerry Holloway considers how factors such as class, age, marital status, race and locality, along with wider economic and political issues, have affected women┐s job opportunities and status.

Key themes and issues that run through the book include:

  • continuity and change
  • the sexual division of labour
  • women as a cheap labour force
  • women┐s perceived primary role of motherhood
  • women and trade unions
  • equality and difference
  • education and training.

Students of women┐s studies, gender studies and history will find this a fascinating and invaluable addition to their reading material.

 

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Contents

PART
11
The problem of the superfluous women
36
PART
53
Equal or different? Divisive issues in the industrial womens
75
Womens work before the First World War
96
Tables
110
PART THREE
127
Womens work in the interwar period
144
PART FOUR
178
Womens employment in the 1950s and 1960s
194
1969
208
continuity and change
222
Notes
249
Further reading
287
Index
296
Copyright

Womens employment in the Second World War
162

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About the author (2005)

Gerry Holloway is a lecturer in Life History and Women's Studies at the Centre for Continuing Education at the University of Sussex. She has written extensively on women┐s history and the feminist movement and is on the Committee of the Women┐s History Network.

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