Lives of the Novelists, Volume 1

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Carey & Lea, 1825 - Authors, English - 4 pages
 

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Page 169 - It having been observed that there was little hospitality in London : JOHNSON. "Nay, Sir, any man who has a name, or who has the power of pleasing, will be very generally invited in London. The man Sterne, I have been told, has had engagements for three months.
Page 169 - If my enemies knew, that by this rage of abuse, and ill-will, they were effectually serving the interests both of myself, and works, they would be more quiet — but it has been the fate of my betters, who have found, that the way to fame, is like the way to heaven — through much tribulation...
Page 4 - I am sorry for H. Fielding's death, not only as I shall read no more of his writings, but I believe he lost more than others, as no man enjoyed life more than he did, though few had less reason to do so, the highest of his preferment being raking in the lowest sinks of vice and misery.
Page 240 - Fountain heads and pathless groves, Places which pale passion loves ! Moonlight walks, when all the fowls Are warmly hous'd save bats and owls! A midnight bell, a parting groan, These are the sounds we feed upon; Then stretch our bones in a still gloomy valley ; Nothing's so dainty sweet as lovely melancholy.
Page 152 - He loved the world that hated him : the tear That dropped upon his Bible was sincere : Assailed by scandal and the tongue of strife, His only answer was, a blameless life ; And he that forged, and he that threw the dart, Had each a brother's interest in his heart.
Page 34 - In this situation, as I could not conquer Nature, I submitted entirely to her, and she made as great a fool of me as she had ever done of any woman whatsoever: under pretence of giving me leave to enjoy, she drew me in to suffer the company of my little ones during eight hours ; and I doubt not whether, in that time, I did not undergo more than in all my distemper.
Page 230 - Udolpho.' Emily gazed with melancholy awe upon the castle, which she understood to be Montoni's; for, though it was now lighted up by the setting sun, the gothic greatness of its features, and its mouldering walls of dark grey stone, rendered it a gloomy and sublime object. As she gazed, the light died away on its walls, leaving a melancholy purple tint, which spread deeper and deeper, as the thin vapour crept up the mountain, whilethe battlements above were still tipped with splendour.
Page 17 - Poor Fielding ! I could not help telling his sister, that I was equally surprised at and concerned for his continued lowness. Had your brother...
Page 39 - And curse those councils which they praise; Would you not wonder, sir, to view Your bard a greater man than you ? Which that he is, you cannot doubt, When you have read the sequel out. You know, great sir, that ancient fellows, Philosophers, and such folks, tell us, No great analogy between Greatness and happiness is seen.
Page 217 - ... heads turn wild with impossible adventures ; and now and then are tainted with democracy. Not so the mighty magician of The Mysteries of Udolpho, bred and- nourished by the Florentine muses in their sacred solitary...

About the author (1825)

Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 15, 1771. He began his literary career by writing metrical tales. The Lay of the Last Minstrel, Marmion, and The Lady of the Lake made him the most popular poet of his day. Sixty-five hundred copies of The Lay of the Last Minstrel were sold in the first three years, a record sale for poetry. His other poems include The Vision of Don Roderick, Rokeby, and The Lord of the Isles. He then abandoned poetry for prose. In 1814, he anonymously published a historical novel, Waverly, or, Sixty Years Since, the first of the series known as the Waverley novels. He wrote 23 novels anonymously during the next 13 years. The first master of historical fiction, he wrote novels that are historical in background rather than in character: A fictitious person always holds the foreground. In their historical sequence, the Waverley novels range in setting from the year 1090, the time of the First Crusade, to 1700, the period covered in St. Roman's Well (1824), set in a Scottish watering place. His other works include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, and The Bride of Lammermoor. He died on September 21, 1832.

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