English Literature Primers: Romance Period

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Harper & brothers, 1878 - English literature - 153 pages
 

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Page 77 - And we will sit upon the rocks, And see the shepherds feed their flocks By shallow rivers, to whose falls Melodious birds sing madrigals.
Page 146 - BULWER'S HORACE. The Odes and Epodes of Horace. A Metrical Translation into English. With Introduction and Commentaries. By LORD LYTTON.
Page 143 - With a, full View of the English-Dutch Struggle against Spain, and of the Origin and Destruction of the Spanish Armada. By JOHN LOTHROP MOTLEY, LL.D., DCL Portraits.
Page 127 - This figure that thou here seest put, It was for gentle SHAKESPEARE cut, Wherein the graver had a strife With nature, to out-do the life : O could he but have drawn his wit As well in brass, as he hath hit His face ; the print would then surpass All that was ever writ in brass. But since he cannot, reader, look Not on his picture, but his book.
Page 143 - The Life and Death of John of Barneveld, Advocate of Holland : with a View of the Primary Causes and Movements of "The Thirty Years
Page 21 - Danced ful oft in many a grene mede. " This was the old opinion as I rede; " I speke of many hundred yeres ago; " But now can no man see non elves mo...
Page 127 - This figure, that thou here seest put, It was for gentle Shakespeare cut; Wherein the graver had a strife With Nature, to out-do the life : O could he but have drawn his wit As well in brass, as he hath hit His face ; the print would then surpass All that was ever writ in brass. But since he cannot, reader, look Not on his picture, but his book.
Page 76 - Sweet are the thoughts that savour of content, The quiet mind is richer than a crown; Sweet are the nights in careless slumber spent, The poor estate scorns Fortune's angry frown. Such sweet content, such minds, such sleep, such bliss, Beggars enjoy, when princes oft do miss.
Page 98 - Crosse he bore, The deare remembrance of his dying Lord, For whose sweete sake that glorious badge he wore...
Page 98 - Of princesse worthy ; scarse them bad arise, Her lordes and ladies all this while devise Themselves to setten forth to straungers sight : Some frounce their curled...

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