A new grammar of the Portuguese and English languages. Pt.1, Port. Pt.2, Ingl. [in Port.].

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Page 47 - Oh that my head were waters, and mine eyes a fountain of tears, that I might weep day and night for the slain of the daughter of my people!
Page 55 - The beauty of Israel is slain upon thy high places : how are the mighty fallen ! Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Askelon ; lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph.
Page 55 - Askelon lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph. Ye mountains of Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither let there be rain upon you, nor fields of offerings; for there the shield of the mighty is vilely cast away, the shield of Saul, as though he had not been anointed with oil.
Page 128 - Thou hast brought a vine out of Egypt; thou hast cast out the heathen and planted it.
Page 131 - the greater genius ; Virgil the better artist: in the " one, we most admire the man; in the other, the " work. Homer hurries us with a commanding " impetuosity; Virgil leads us with an attractive " majesty. Homer scatters with a generous profusion ; « Virgil bestows with a careful magnificence. Homer, " like the Nile, pours out his riches with a sudden " overflow; Virgil, like a river in its banks, with a
Page 129 - Thou preparedst room before it, And didst cause it to take deep root, and it filled the land. The hills were covered with the shadow of it, And the boughs thereof were like the goodly cedars. She sent out her boughs unto the sea, And her branches unto the river.
Page 48 - I seem to myself to behold this city, the ornament of the earth, and the capital of all nations, suddenly involved in one conflagration. I see before me the slaughtered heaps of citizens, lying unburied in the midst of their ruined country. The furious countenance *:f Cethegus rises to my view, while, with a savage joy be is triumphing in your miseries.
Page 129 - Why hast thou then broken down her hedges, so that all they which pass by the way do pluck her ? The boar out of the wood doth waste it, and the wild beast of the field doth devour it.
Page 47 - And when we look upon their machines, Homer seems like his own Jupiter, in his terrors, shaking Olympus, scattering the lightnings, and firing the heavens; Virgil, like the same power, in his benevolence, counselling with the gods, laying plans for empires, and ordering his whole creation.
Page 55 - The tones and inflections of the voice at the close of a sentence, ought to be diversified, according to the general nature of the discourse, and the particular construction and meaning of the sentence. In plain narrative, and especially in argumentation, a small attention to the...

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