The Age of the Democratic Revolution: The challenge

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 1959 - History - 544 pages

For the Western world as a whole, the period from about 1760 to 1800 was the great revolutionary era in which the outlines of the modern democratic state came into being. It is the thesis of this major work that the American, French, and Polish revolutions, and the movements for political change in Britain, Ireland, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, Sweden, and other countries, though each distinctive in its own way, were all manifestations of recognizably similar political ideas, needs, and conflicts.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Preface
3
The Constituted Bodies
27
Theory and Practice
55
Clashes with Monarchy
85
Geneva and JeanJacques Rousseau
111
The British Parliament between King and People
143
The Forces in Conflict
185
The People as Constituent Power
213
Democrats and AristocratsDutch Belgian and Swiss
323
The Limitations of Enlightened Despotism
373
The Lessons of Poland
411
The Aristocratic Resurgence
439
The Explosion of 1789
469
References for the Quotations at Heads of Chapters
505
The Virginia Declaration of Rights of 1776 and the French
518
Index
529

Europe and the American Revolution
239
Two Parliaments Escape Reform
285

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information