Political and Literary Anecdotes of His Own Times

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J. Murray, 1818 - Anecdotes - 252 pages

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Page 206 - Walkenshaw should be removed to a convent for a certain term; but her gallant absolutely refused to comply with this demand : and although Mr M'Namara, the gentleman who was sent to him, who...
Page 237 - Howe, a sensible, well-natured man, possessed of an estate of £700 or £800 per annum. He married a young lady of a good family in the west of England : her maiden name was Mallet ; she was agreeable in her person and manners, and proved a very good wife. Seven or eight years after they had been married, he rose one morning very early, and told his wife he was...
Page 129 - Since the noble lord hath discovered in our manners such a similitude, I am well content to be compared to the prophet Balaam ; but, my lords, I am at a loss how to make out the other part of the parallel: I...
Page 102 - If the Duke, who left at his death more than a million and a half sterling, could have foreseen that all his wealth and honours were to be inherited by a grandson of my Lord Trevor's, who had been one of his enemies, would he have been so careful to save sixpence for the sake of his heir ? Not for the sake of his heir; but he would always have saved a sixpence.
Page 241 - When Howe left his wife, they lived in a house in Jermyn-street, near St. James's church ; he went no farther than to a little street in Westminster, where he took a room, for which he paid five or six shillings a week, and changing his name, and disguising himself by wearing a black wig (for he was a fair man), he remained in this habitation during the whole time of his absence. He had...
Page 199 - He came one evening to my lodgings and drank tea with me ; my servant, after he was gone, said to me that he thought my new visitor very like Prince Charles. 'Why...
Page 199 - He has an handsome face and good eyes; (I think his busts, which about this time were commonly sold in London, are more like him than any of his pictures which I have yet seen;) but in...
Page 103 - ... was helped into his chariot (for he was then very lame and infirm), and went home ; some little time after he returned to the same coffee-house on purpose to acquaint the woman who kept it that she had given him a bad halfpenny, and demanded another in exchange for it. Sir JAMES had about 40,0007. per annum, and was at a loss whom to appoint his heir.
Page 205 - When he was in Scotland he had a mistress, whose name is Walkenshaw, and whose sister was at that time, and is still housekeeper at Leicester house. Some years after he was released from his prison, and conducted out of France, he sent for this girl, who soon acquired such a dominion over him, that she was acquainted with all his schemes, and trusted with his most secret correspondence. As soon as this was known in England, all those persons of distinction who were attached to him were greatly alarmed...
Page 201 - But I was still more astonished, when I found him unacquainted with the history and constitution of England, in which he ought to have been very early '! instructed. I never heard him express any noble or benevolent sentiments, the certain indications of a great soul and a good heart; or ' discover any sorrow or compassion lor the misfortunes of so many worthy men who had suffered in his cause.

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