The Confessions of an English Opium Eater: Being an Extract from the Life of a Scholar

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Macmillan, 1900 - Authors, English - 211 pages
 

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Page 184 - If music be the food of love, play on ; Give me excess of it ; that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die.
Page 133 - I was stared at, hooted at, grinned at, chattered at, by monkeys, by paroquets, by cockatoos. I ran into pagodas; and was fixed for centuries at the summit, or in secret rooms; I was the idol; I was the priest; I was worshipped; I was sacrificed.
Page 180 - Methought I heard a voice cry "Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep," the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast, — Lady M.
Page 140 - I knew not whether from the good cause or the bad ; darkness and lights ; tempest and human faces ; and at last, with the sense that all was lost, female forms, and the features that were worth all the world to me, and but a moment allowed, and clasped hands...
Page 180 - Who was it that thus cried? Why, worthy Thane, You do unbend your noble strength to think So brainsickly of things. Go get some water And wash this filthy witness from your hand. Why did you bring these daggers from the place?
Page 139 - I often heard in dreams — a music of preparation and of awakening suspense, a music like the opening of the Coronation Anthem, and which, like that, gave the feeling of a vast march, of infinite cavalcades filing off, and the tread of innumerable armies.
Page 139 - ... issue. I, as is usual in dreams (where, of necessity, we make ourselves central to every movement), had the power, and yet, had not the power to decide it. I had the power, if I could raise myself, to will it; and yet again had not the power; for the weight of twenty Atlantics was upon me, or the oppression of inexpiable guilt. 'Deeper than ever plummet sounded,
Page 130 - I have called the tyranny of the human face began to unfold itself. Perhaps some part of my London life might be answerable for this. Be that as it may, now it was that upon the rocking waters of the ocean the human face began to appear ; the sea appeared paved with innumerable faces upturned to the heavens — faces imploring, wrathful, despairing, surged upwards by thousands, by myriads, by generations, by centuries : my agitation was infinite ; my mind tossed and surged with the ocean.
Page 122 - That as the creative state of the eye increased, a sympathy seemed to arise between the waking and the dreaming states of the brain in one point— that whatsoever I happened to call up and to trace by a voluntary act upon the darkness was very apt to transfer itself to my dreams...
Page 131 - China, and among Chinese manners and modes of life and scenery, I should go mad. The causes of my horror lie deep ; and some of them must be common to others. Southern Asia, in general, is the seat of awful images and associations.

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