The Essays of Michael de Montaigne, Volume 1

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Contents

I
1
III
6
IV
11
V
21
VII
24
VIII
28
IX
31
XI
33
LIV
269
LVI
271
LVIII
276
LIX
281
LXI
285
LXIII
300
LXV
308
LXVI
335

XII
34
XIV
41
XV
44
XVII
50
XIX
53
XXI
55
XXIII
56
XXV
58
XXVII
63
XXVIII
66
XXIX
70
XXXI
93
XXXIII
108
XXXV
109
XXXVI
132
XXXVIII
144
XL
161
XLI
209
XLII
215
XLIV
233
XLV
234
XLVII
242
XLVIII
260
L
263
LII
265
LXIX
339
LXXI
353
LXXIII
356
LXXIV
359
LXXVI
361
LXXVIII
368
LXXX
376
LXXXII
388
LXXXIV
395
LXXXVI
399
LXXXVIII
403
XC
404
XCII
406
XCIV
410
XCV
413
XCVI
425
XCVII
429
XCIX
438
CI
452
CIII
472
CIV
475
CV
481
CVII
495
CIX
499
CX
526

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Popular passages

Page 411 - Still to be neat, still to be drest, As you were going to a feast ; Still to be powdered, still perfumed: Lady, it is to be presumed, Though art's hid causes are not found, All is not sweet, all is not sound.
Page 33 - The glitt'ring species here and there divide, And cast their dubious beams from side to side; Now on the walls, now on the pavement play, And to the ceiling flash the glaring day.
Page 177 - But, withal, let my governor remember to what end his instructions are principally directed, and that he do not so much imprint in his pupil's memory the date of the ruin of Carthage, as the manners of Hannibal and Scipio; nor so much where Marcellus died, as why it was unworthy of his duty that he died there.
Page 263 - For what man is he that can know the counsel of GOD ? or who can think what the will of the LORD is? For the thoughts of mortal men are miserable, and our devices are but uncertain. For the corruptible body presseth down the soul, and the earthly tabernacle weigheth down the mind that museth upon many things.
Page 252 - I think there is more barbarity in eating a man alive than in eating him dead...
Page 171 - ... memory. That which a man rightly knows and understands, he is the free disposer of at his own full liberty, without any regard to the author from whence he had it, or fumbling over the leaves of his book.
Page 411 - Though art's hid causes are not found, All is not sweet, all is not sound. Give me a look, give me a face, That makes simplicity a grace; Robes loosely flowing, hair as free: Such sweet neglect more taketh me Than all th' adulteries of art; They strike mine eyes, but not my heart.
Page 38 - ... and a field indefinite, without bound or limit. The Pythagoreans make good to be certain and finite, and evil, infinite and uncertain. There are a thousand ways to miss the white, there is only one to hit it. For my own part, I have this vice in...
Page 187 - Since philosophy is that which instructs us to live, and that infancy has there its lessons as well as other ages, why is it not communicated to children betimes? "The clay is moist and soft; now, now make haste, And form the vessel, for the wheel turns fast.

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