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Books Books 1 - 7 of 7 on I try to show that when we describe people as exercising qualities of mind, we are....
" I try to show that when we describe people as exercising qualities of mind, we are not referring to occult episodes of which their overt acts and utterances are effects; we are referring to those overt acts and utterances themselves. "
Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading - Page 5
by Alvin I. Goldman - 2006 - 384 pages
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Philosophical Mysteries

Stephen David Ross - Philosophy - 1981 - 151 pages
...of being is invoked. 9 When we describe people as exercising qualities ot mind, we are not reterring to occult episodes of which their overt acts and utterances...referring to those overt acts and utterances themselves. There are, of course, differences, crucial for our inquiry, between describing an action as pertormed...
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The Concept of Mind

Gilbert Ryle - Philosophy - 1984 - 334 pages
...disobediences. CHAPTER II KNOWING HOW AND KNOWING THAT (1) Foreword. IN this chapter I try to show that when we describe people as exercising qualities...referring to those overt acts and utterances themselves. There are, of course, differences, crucial for our inquiry, between describing an action as performed...
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Donald Davidson

Simon Evnine - Biography & Autobiography - 1991 - 198 pages
...mind. The first is public, the second private. (Ryle 1949, p. 11) Instead of this, Ryle wanted to show that 'when we describe people as exercising qualities...those overt acts and utterances themselves' (1949, p. 25). This is the central tenet of behaviourism. Wittgentstein was also influential in this respect....
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Nature of the Self: A Philosophy on Human Nature

S. K. Leung - Philosophy - 2000 - 416 pages
...that 'knowing' is no more than 'knowing how' and it is best expressed in the following words, quoted: 'When we describe people as exercising qualities of...to those overt acts and utterances themselves...' (The Concept of Mind, chapter II, (1), (Foreword)). If this doctrine is taken seriously, there will...
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A Hundred Years of English Philosophy

N. Milkov - Philosophy - 2003 - 302 pages
...hypothetical sentences, gradually gained in importance. In the end, the following idea crystallised: when we describe people as exercising qualities of...referring to those overt acts and utterances themselves, (p. 26) The intelligent behaviour itself is reasoning. Evidently, the central thesis of this doctrine...
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Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century, Volume 2: The Age of Meaning

Scott Soames - Philosophy - 2005 - 504 pages
...to chapter 2, where Ryle sets out what he is up to on the first page. In this chapter I try to show that when we describe people as exercising qualities...we are referring to those overt acts and utterances themselves.11 Ryle wants to show that we do not refer to private mental states and events when we use...
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Back to the Rough Grounds of Praxis: Exploring Theological Method with ...

Daniel Franklin Pilario - Philosophy - 2005 - 584 pages
...lorry-driver's seat, the studio and the football field."261 Thus, when we refer to people as having 'qualities of mind', "we are not referring to occult...we are referring to those overt acts and utterances themselves."262 For Geertz, therefore, culture — like Ryle's 'mind' - is also a public and an observable...
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