Vespasian

Front Cover
Routledge, Oct 4, 2016 - History - 346 pages

From a pre-eminent biographer in the field, this volume examines the life and times of the emperor Vespasian and challenges the validity of his perennial good reputation and universally acknowledged achievements. Levick examines how this plebeian and uncharismatic Emperor restored peace and confidence to Rome and ensured a smooth succession, how he coped with the military, political and economic problems of his reign, and his evaluation of the solutions to these problems, before she finally examines his posthumous reputation.

Now updated to take account of the past 15 years of scholarship, and with a new chapter on literature under the Flavians, Vespasian is a fascinating study for students of Roman history and the general classical enthusiast alike.

 

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User Review  - MarthaJeanne - LibraryThing

I have no idea whether or not this book is good when read by someone with a better idea of Ancient Roman history than mine, but I gave up because the further I read the more confused I got. Read full review

Contents

List of plates
W VVIntroduction
the command in Britain
V4W The bid for Empire
xxxiii
V5W Ideology in action
xlix
V6W A new Emperor and his opponents
xlix
V7W Financial survival
xlix
the winning of peace
vi
Vespasianis army and the extension of the Empire
lxv
12W Vespasian and his sons
lxxv
13W Literature and politics in the Flavian
xcviii
ideology in the aftermath
cxvi
Concordance
cxxxv
Bibliography
clxxix
Notes
6
Index of persons
113

the physical and moral restoration of
iv

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About the author (2016)

Barbara Levick is Fellow and Tutor Emeritus, St. Hilda’s College, Oxford. She has published extensively on Roman history, with titles including Tiberius the Politician (Routledge, 1999), Vespasian (Routledge, 1999), The Government of the Roman Empire, second edition (Routledge, 2001), Julia Domna: Syrian Empress (Routledge, 2007) and Augustus: Image and Substance (2010).

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